Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 05 Jan 2018
The addition of an antihypertensive drug from a new class to a patient’s regimen results in huge decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and major cardiovascular (CV) events among those at high risk for CV events but without diabetes, suggests a recent study. Its effects on SBP remain large and similar in magnitude across all levels of baseline drug use and all subgroups of patients.
Pearl Toh, 4 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
Yesterday
The risk of stroke and subsequent mortality is significantly elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a recent study has shown.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 10 Jan 2018

Adding rifampicin to standard antibiotic therapy does not improve outcomes in individuals with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteraemia, the ARREST* trial shows. However, rifampicin may contribute towards a minor reduction in bacteraemia recurrence.

Light, moderate alcohol intake may protect against all-cause, CVD death

25 Aug 2017

It appears that light and moderate consumption of alcohol may be protective against all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD)-specific mortality, suggests a recent study involving adults in the United States. On the other hand, heavy or binge drinking correlates with elevated risk of all-cause and cancer-specific mortality.

Researchers included a total of 333,247 participants aged ≥18 years. They obtained data by linking 13 waves of the National Health Interview Surveys (1997 to 2009) to the National Heath Index records through 31 December 2011.

Self-reported alcohol intake patterns were classified into six groups: lifetime abstainers; lifetime infrequent drinkers; former drinkers; and current light, moderate or heavy drinkers. Secondary exposure included binge-drinking status of participants. All-cause, cancer or CVD mortality was the main outcome.

Of the participants, 34,754 died of all causes (including 8,947 and 8,427 CVD and cancer deaths, respectively) after a median follow-up of 8.2 years (2.7 million person-years).

Light or moderate alcohol drinkers had a reduced risk of mortality for all causes (light: hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95 percent CI, 0.76 to 0.82; moderate: HR, 0.78; 0.74 to 0.82) and CVD (light: HR, 0.74; 0.69 to 0.80; moderate: HR, 0.71; 0.64 to 0.78) compared with lifetime abstainers.

On the contrary, heavy alcohol consumers had a significantly increased risk of mortality for all cause (HR, 1.11; 1.04 to 1.19) and cancer (HR, 1.27; 1.13 to 1.42). Also, an association existed between binge drinking ≥1 day/week and increased risk of all-cause (HR, 1.13; 1.04 to 1.23) and cancer mortality (HR, 1.22; 1.05 to 1.41).

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Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 05 Jan 2018
The addition of an antihypertensive drug from a new class to a patient’s regimen results in huge decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and major cardiovascular (CV) events among those at high risk for CV events but without diabetes, suggests a recent study. Its effects on SBP remain large and similar in magnitude across all levels of baseline drug use and all subgroups of patients.
Pearl Toh, 4 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
Yesterday
The risk of stroke and subsequent mortality is significantly elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a recent study has shown.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 10 Jan 2018

Adding rifampicin to standard antibiotic therapy does not improve outcomes in individuals with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteraemia, the ARREST* trial shows. However, rifampicin may contribute towards a minor reduction in bacteraemia recurrence.