Most Read Articles
Dr Margaret Shi, 10 Feb 2020
First-recorded diagnoses of psychiatric disorders are associated with increases in risk of subsequent self-harm that vary by diagnostic categories across gender and age groups, with the highest risk observed in patients with substance misuse or dependence, a 10-year case-control study in Hong Kong has shown. 
Tristan Manalac, 29 Jan 2020
Migraine headaches are common in Singapore and may be a potential risk factor for psychiatric problems, according to a recent Study.
Jairia Dela Cruz, Yesterday
Mental disorders and chronic physical conditions represent a serious public health burden in Singapore, with chronic pain, major depressive disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, cardiovascular disease and generalized anxiety disorder being the top five contributors to increased number of years lived with disability in the general population, according to a recent study.

Life events tied to self-injurious behaviours in teens

07 Feb 2020
CGH emphasizes importance of early intervention for trauma patients

Interpersonal life events predict the onset of direct self-injurious behaviours (D-SIBs) among adolescents, a recent study has found.

Researchers longitudinally assessed 1,933 adolescents (mean age, 14.84±0.9 years; 51.47 percent female) for the onset of D-SIBs, assessed using the self-report instrument Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory. Life events were evaluated using a self-reported checklist containing 27 major and minor life events.

After 12 months of follow-up, the incidence rate of D-SIB was 6.7 percent, and did not differ in males and females (50.8 percent vs 49.2 percent; p=0.596). These participants experienced a mean of 3.68±2.69 life events 6 months before baseline, while their non-D-SIB counterparts reported an average of 3.02±2.07 life events.

The number of life events emerged as a significant predictor of first-onset D-SIB. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that each additional life event increased the likelihood of D-SIB by 11 percent (odds ratio [OR], 1.11, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.00–1.23; p=0.053).

In contrast, gender (OR, 0.74, 95 percent CI, 0.39–1.41; p=0.361) and its interaction with life events (OR, 1.06, 95 percent CI, 0.91–1.22; p=0.478) were not associated with D-SIB onset.

Further disaggregation of specific life events found that encountering trouble with bullies (OR, 2.45, 95 percent CI, 1.13–5.30; p=0.023), having parents who stop or start working (OR, 1.98, 95 percent CI, 1.21–3.24; p=0.007), having trouble with parents (OR, 1.94, 95 percent CI, 1.29–2.93; p=0.002), getting into a serious argument with a close friend (OR, 1.86, 95 percent CI, 1.19–2.90; p=0.007), and changes in the health of a family member (OR, 1.77, 95 percent CI, 1.22–2.56; p=0.003) were all significant risk factors for developing D-SIBs.

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Most Read Articles
Dr Margaret Shi, 10 Feb 2020
First-recorded diagnoses of psychiatric disorders are associated with increases in risk of subsequent self-harm that vary by diagnostic categories across gender and age groups, with the highest risk observed in patients with substance misuse or dependence, a 10-year case-control study in Hong Kong has shown. 
Tristan Manalac, 29 Jan 2020
Migraine headaches are common in Singapore and may be a potential risk factor for psychiatric problems, according to a recent Study.
Jairia Dela Cruz, Yesterday
Mental disorders and chronic physical conditions represent a serious public health burden in Singapore, with chronic pain, major depressive disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, cardiovascular disease and generalized anxiety disorder being the top five contributors to increased number of years lived with disability in the general population, according to a recent study.