Most Read Articles
27 Nov 2017
Transdermal oestradiol added to progesterone reduces menopause-related depression, researchers reported at the annual meeting of The North American Menopause Society in Philadelphia, US.
5 days ago
Intravenous (IV) iron is less toxic and more effective compared to oral iron, making it a potential frontline therapy for neonatal iron deficiency anaemia, suggests a recent study.
Shilpa Kolhe, MBBS, MD, MRCOG; Shilpa Deb, MBBS, DGO, MRCOG, 01 Aug 2012

Dysmenorrhoea is a medical condition characterized by severe uterine pain during menstruation manifesting as cyclical lower abdominal or pelvic pain, which may also radiate to the back and thighs. The term dysmenorrhoea is derived from the Greek words ‘dys’ meaning difficult, painful or abnormal, ‘meno’ meaning month, and ‘rrhea’ meaning flow. It is commonly divided into primary dysmenorrhoea, where there is no coexistent pathology, and secondary dysmenorrhoea where there is an identifiable pathological condition known to contribute to painful menstruation. Symptoms of primary dysmenorrhoea begin a few hours before the start of menstruation and are often relieved during the first few days of bleeding. The initial onset of primary dysmenorrhoea is usually shortly after menarche (6–12 months), when ovulatory cycles are established. Secondary dysmenorrhoea can also occur at any time after menarche but is most commonly observed in women in their third and fourth decade of life in association with an existing condition.

27 Nov 2017
Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global problem. Chronic HBV infection is probably the most common maternal infection encountered in Hong Kong, China, and Southeast Asia. In Hong Kong, which is one of the endemic areas, immunisation against HBV was first provided in 1983 to infants born to mothers who were screened positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Immunisation became widespread since November 1988, but HBsAg-positive mothers are still encountered frequently.1

Lidocaine nerve block useful for easing pain during IUD insertion

02 Oct 2017

Use of a 10-mL 1% lidocaine paracervical nerve block may substantially reduce pain during insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD) in adolescents and young women relative to a sham block with pressure on the vaginal epithelium, a study has shown.

The trial included 95 young women aged 14 to 22 years who had a 13.5-mg levonorgestrel IUD inserted, were nulliparous, and not currently or recently pregnant. Of these, 47 were randomly assigned to the lidocaine block group and 48 in the sham block group.

Resulting data showed that the primary outcome of pain after IUD insertion, measured with a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS), was significantly lower in the lidocaine block group than in the sham block group (mean VAS score, 30.0 vs 71.5; p<0.001).

The lidocaine block group received 1 mL of 1% lidocaine at the tenaculum site and 4.5 mL in the 4- and 8-o’clock positions at the cervicovaginal junction. To allow onset of action for the drug, IUD was inserted after 3 minutes of lidocaine application.

On the other hand, the sham block group received pressure to the same three sites using the unbroken, wood end of a cotton-tipped applicator to depress the vaginal epithelium 1 centimetre.

The present data have important implications considering the low uptake of IUD use among young women, which is largely driven by concerns about pain during the procedure, researchers said.

“By demonstrating the effectiveness of a pain management option for young, nulliparous women that is easy to perform, our findings could reduce patient concerns about pain and increase IUD use, which is known to reduce rates of unintended pregnancies, births and abortions in this population,” they added.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS JPOG - Malaysia digital copy today!
DOWNLOAD
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
27 Nov 2017
Transdermal oestradiol added to progesterone reduces menopause-related depression, researchers reported at the annual meeting of The North American Menopause Society in Philadelphia, US.
5 days ago
Intravenous (IV) iron is less toxic and more effective compared to oral iron, making it a potential frontline therapy for neonatal iron deficiency anaemia, suggests a recent study.
Shilpa Kolhe, MBBS, MD, MRCOG; Shilpa Deb, MBBS, DGO, MRCOG, 01 Aug 2012

Dysmenorrhoea is a medical condition characterized by severe uterine pain during menstruation manifesting as cyclical lower abdominal or pelvic pain, which may also radiate to the back and thighs. The term dysmenorrhoea is derived from the Greek words ‘dys’ meaning difficult, painful or abnormal, ‘meno’ meaning month, and ‘rrhea’ meaning flow. It is commonly divided into primary dysmenorrhoea, where there is no coexistent pathology, and secondary dysmenorrhoea where there is an identifiable pathological condition known to contribute to painful menstruation. Symptoms of primary dysmenorrhoea begin a few hours before the start of menstruation and are often relieved during the first few days of bleeding. The initial onset of primary dysmenorrhoea is usually shortly after menarche (6–12 months), when ovulatory cycles are established. Secondary dysmenorrhoea can also occur at any time after menarche but is most commonly observed in women in their third and fourth decade of life in association with an existing condition.

27 Nov 2017
Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global problem. Chronic HBV infection is probably the most common maternal infection encountered in Hong Kong, China, and Southeast Asia. In Hong Kong, which is one of the endemic areas, immunisation against HBV was first provided in 1983 to infants born to mothers who were screened positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Immunisation became widespread since November 1988, but HBsAg-positive mothers are still encountered frequently.1