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Insulin preparation, administration faster with pen devices vs vial and syringe

09 May 2019
Reduced dependence on insulin injections may make patients more inclined to comply with treatment and reduce adverse effects of the injections such as local lipomas or scars.

Nurses who utilize the pen device take less time preparing and administering insulin compared with those who use the vial and syringe method, reports a recent study.

In total, 137 nurses participated in the study. The time taken by nurses to prepare and administer insulin was shorter with the pen device relative to vial and syringe (79±18 seconds vs 88±20 seconds; p<0.001). The pen device registered a 90±7-percent overall average completion rate of steps compared with 88±7 percent with the vial and syringe method.

“Furthermore, areas were identified for potential nursing education to enhance safe and appropriate use of insulin with both delivery methods,” the authors said.

A previous study comparing nurses’ perceptions and satisfaction with the use of insulin pen devices vs vial and syringes for insulin delivery in an inpatient setting found that nurses felt more comfortable and confident with pen devices compared with vial and syringes. In addition, they perceived pens to be a safer alternative for both patients and themselves. [Diabetes Technol Ther 2014;16:742-746]

The present observational and exploratory study utilized a time–motion analysis of nurses’ administration of insulin using pen vs vial and syringe delivery methods. The authors observed, video-recorded and timed nurses during insulin preparation and administration using each delivery method. The steps performed by nurses were observed against recommended processes for insulin preparation and administration. The authors also noted the percentage of nurses completing each step.

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Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 04 Sep 2019
Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2), as compared with dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), inhibitors appears to reduce the risk of heart failure and any-cause death without major cardiovascular events in the primary intention-to-treat analysis, according to a study.
Pearl Toh, 04 Sep 2019
More intensive LDL-lowering by adding ezetimibe to simvastatin in elderly individuals aged ≥75 years significantly reduced recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events without raising safety issues compared with simvastatin alone, a secondary analysis of the IMPROVE-IT* has shown.
27 Aug 2019
A once-weekly regimen of 25 mg trelagliptin is effective and safe for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease, reports a new study.
Elvira Manzano, 2 days ago

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), in an update of its 2013 recommendations, called on clinicians to offer risk-reducing medications to women who are at increased risk for breast cancer but at low risk for adverse effects.