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Rachel Soon, 5 days ago

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Increased breastfeeding frequency, duration protective against cataract

20 Jun 2018

Parous women who are breastfeeding more children and have been doing so in the long-term appear to have a lower risk of developing cortical cataract, a study reports.

Researchers analysed data from 3,821 parous women at least 50 years of age in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-2012. The women were grouped into four according to the number of breastfed children (0 to 1, 2, 3 and 4–12) and breastfeeding duration in months (0–16, 17–35, 36–60 and 61–324).

Of the women, 2,197 (57.5 percent) had age-related cataract. Logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of developing cortical cataract was significantly lower in women who breastfed 4–12 children than in those who breastfed no or one child (odds ratio [OR], 0.56; 95 percent CI, 0.35–0.89; p=0.010 for trend across quartiles).

Likewise, the risk was reduced in women who breastfed for 36–60 months (OR, 0.61; 0.42–0.90) or 61–324 months (OR, 0.53; 0.33–0.83) than in those who breastfed for 16 months or less (p=0.003 for trend across tertiles).

The population-attributable fractions of cortical cataract associated with number of children breastfed <3 and duration of breastfeeding <36 months were 9.4 percent and 10.7 percent, respectively.

Researchers postulated that some metabolic diseases are likely to mediate the protective role of breastfeeding on age-related cataract. Several pathways have been implicated in the reduced risks of metabolic diseases in women who breastfed relatively many children or for a long-term period. For example, fat accumulated during pregnancy could be used to produce energy of lactation, and changes in weight during lactation might help reduce the risk of metabolic diseases.

Additional prospective and longitudinal studies are required to clarify the mechanisms underlying breastfeeding-related cataract formation, they added.

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Most Read Articles
Rachel Soon, 5 days ago

On 8 August, the first town hall held by the Ministry of Health (MOH) with members of the pharmacy profession took place in Putrajaya. Over 500 pharmacists from across the country and from different areas of practice—community and hospital, public and private, academy and industry—converged to fill the auditorium for the chance to engage in direct dialogue with MOH.

Stephen Padilla, 6 days ago
Early administration of recombinant human B-type natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) can lower the incidence of reperfusion injury for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who are receiving percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) treatment, according to a China study.
11 Aug 2019
Intraoperative methylprednisolone does not appear to significantly prevent the incidence of death, cardiac arrest and other injuries in neonates undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, according to a recent study.
3 days ago
Pulmonary function has potential predictive value for future increases in arterial stiffness and its progression, as reported in a recent study.