Most Read Articles
Jairia Dela Cruz, 10 Apr 2019
Treatment with tofacitinib yields significant improvements in signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients from the Asia Pacific, according to data from a posthoc analysis. The drug has a safety profile consistent with global tofacitinib studies, although infections occur more frequently in Asians.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 30 Apr 2019
In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in remission, increasing the dose interval of tocilizumab injection from the standard 162 mg once weekly to twice weekly may do more harm than good. Specifically, such a strategy is associated with a lower chance of remission maintenance as well as a lack of improvement in tolerability, as shown in a recent trial.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 29 Apr 2019
Physicians are likely to underestimate the severity of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in patients who are older, show higher fatigue levels, complain of greater pain or have poorer mental health, according to a Singapore study. In contrast, overestimation of disease severity by physicians tends to occur in the presence of higher swollen joint counts.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 05 Jan 2017
Patients with early arthritis should be allowed to share in the decision making regarding the approach to treatment, with rheumatologists acting as the primary specialists, according to the 2016 update of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for early arthritis management.

Incidence of arterial, venous thrombosis high in patients with antibody-associated vasculitis

21 Mar 2019

There appears to be a high incidence of arterial and venous thrombosis among patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV), particularly during the first year of diagnosis, according to a study.

A total of 204 patients with AAV were identified, with a median follow-up of 5.8 years (range, 1–10; 1,088 person-years [PY]) for surviving patients. The incidence of arterial thrombotic events (ATE) was 2.67/100 PY (1.56 for coronary events and 1.10 for ischaemic stroke), while that of venous thromboembolism (VTE) was 1.47/100 PY (0.83 for deep venous thrombosis [DVT] and 0.62 for pulmonary embolism [PE] with/without DVT).

Multivariate analysis revealed that the only independent predictors of ATE were prior ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and advance age. There remained an increased incidence of ATE at 2.32/100 PY (1.26 for coronary events and 1.06 for ischaemic stroke) among patients without prior IHD or stroke. ATE, but not VTE, independently predicted all-cause mortality.

The highest event rates for both ATE and VTE were recorded in the first year after diagnosis of AAV, which remained above the population incidence during the 10-year follow-up period. Compared to reported rates for the UK population, event rates were 15-times higher for coronary events, 11-times higher for incident stroke and 20-times higher for VTE in this cohort of AAV patients.

This retrospective cohort study aimed to determine the incidence of ATE (coronary events or ischaemic stroke) and VTE (PE or DVT) in patients diagnosed with AAV between 2005 and 2014.

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Most Read Articles
Jairia Dela Cruz, 10 Apr 2019
Treatment with tofacitinib yields significant improvements in signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients from the Asia Pacific, according to data from a posthoc analysis. The drug has a safety profile consistent with global tofacitinib studies, although infections occur more frequently in Asians.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 30 Apr 2019
In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in remission, increasing the dose interval of tocilizumab injection from the standard 162 mg once weekly to twice weekly may do more harm than good. Specifically, such a strategy is associated with a lower chance of remission maintenance as well as a lack of improvement in tolerability, as shown in a recent trial.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 29 Apr 2019
Physicians are likely to underestimate the severity of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in patients who are older, show higher fatigue levels, complain of greater pain or have poorer mental health, according to a Singapore study. In contrast, overestimation of disease severity by physicians tends to occur in the presence of higher swollen joint counts.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 05 Jan 2017
Patients with early arthritis should be allowed to share in the decision making regarding the approach to treatment, with rheumatologists acting as the primary specialists, according to the 2016 update of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for early arthritis management.