Most Read Articles
Rachel Soon, 6 days ago

On 8 August, the first town hall held by the Ministry of Health (MOH) with members of the pharmacy profession took place in Putrajaya. Over 500 pharmacists from across the country and from different areas of practice—community and hospital, public and private, academy and industry—converged to fill the auditorium for the chance to engage in direct dialogue with MOH.

4 days ago
Pulmonary function has potential predictive value for future increases in arterial stiffness and its progression, as reported in a recent study.
3 days ago
Systolic blood pressure appears to have a strong association with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) but not with unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA), whereas current smoking and female sex are risk factors for both conditions, a study has found.
5 days ago
Poor adherence to blood pressure-lowering medications does not appear to be a cause of masked uncontrolled hypertension (MUCH), with a recent study showing that the levels of medication adherence is similar between patients with MUCH and those with true controlled hypertension.

Higher maternal age linked to increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes

25 Feb 2018

The risk of unfavourable pregnancy outcomes, such as chromosomal abnormalities, miscarriage and birth before 34 weeks of gestation, appears to be heightened in women aged >40 years than in those who are younger, according to a study from Denmark.

Researchers analysed data from a nationwide cohort of 369,516 singleton pregnancies followed from 11 to 14 weeks of gestation to delivery or termination of pregnancy. Pregnant women aged 35 years were divided into two advanced maternal age groups (35–39 years and 40 years) and compared with pregnant women aged 20–34 years. Adverse pregnancy outcomes investigated were chromosomal abnormalities, congenital malformations, miscarriage, stillbirth and birth before 34 weeks of gestation.

At least one of the selected adverse pregnancy outcomes occurred in 10.82 percent of pregnant women aged 40 years vs 5.46 percent of pregnant women aged 20–34 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.02; 99.8 percent CI, 1.78–2.29).

Compared with those who were younger, older pregnant women had a higher risk of chromosomal abnormalities (3.83 percent vs 0.56 percent; OR, 7.44; 5.93–9.34), miscarriage (1.68 percent vs 0.42 percent; OR, 3.10; 2.19–4.38) and birth before 34 weeks of gestation (2.01 percent vs 1.21 percent; OR, 1.66; 1.23–2.24). No such increase was observed in the risk of congenital malformations and stillbirth.

The risk prediction chart showed that advanced maternal age, use of assisted reproductive technology, nulliparous pregnancy, smoking during pregnancy and obesity all increased the absolute predictive risk of an adverse pregnancy outcome.

Findings of the present study indicate that while several factors increase the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, advanced maternal age drives a high proportion of the total risk score. This highlights the importance of closely monitoring pregnancies in women aged >40 years.

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Most Read Articles
Rachel Soon, 6 days ago

On 8 August, the first town hall held by the Ministry of Health (MOH) with members of the pharmacy profession took place in Putrajaya. Over 500 pharmacists from across the country and from different areas of practice—community and hospital, public and private, academy and industry—converged to fill the auditorium for the chance to engage in direct dialogue with MOH.

4 days ago
Pulmonary function has potential predictive value for future increases in arterial stiffness and its progression, as reported in a recent study.
3 days ago
Systolic blood pressure appears to have a strong association with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) but not with unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA), whereas current smoking and female sex are risk factors for both conditions, a study has found.
5 days ago
Poor adherence to blood pressure-lowering medications does not appear to be a cause of masked uncontrolled hypertension (MUCH), with a recent study showing that the levels of medication adherence is similar between patients with MUCH and those with true controlled hypertension.