Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
Elvira Manzano, 2 days ago
Cancer patients at risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) are less likely to experience recurrence with rivaroxaban compared with dalteparin, the Select-D trial has shown, ushering in a new standard of care (SoC) for cancer-related VTE.
6 days ago

It appears that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) secondary to both traditional and RA-related risk factors, a recent study has found.

Yesterday
Weight loss medications that have received the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval appear to confer only modest positive benefits for cardiometabolic risk profile, according to a study.

High opioid users more satisfied with care

6 days ago
The opioid epidemic in the US has presented a complicated moral dilemma to doctors when treating potential drug abusers.

In patients with musculoskeletal conditions, opioid prescriptions result in better patient satisfaction, a recent cross-sectional study has found.

The researchers evaluated satisfaction with care of 19,566 adult patients with musculoskeletal problems and found that opioid use resulted in a 32-percent increase in the odds of high care satisfaction (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.32; 95 percent CI, 1.18–1.49). The rate of opioid prescription was 13.1 percent, with 2,564 users reported.

Compared with nonusers, opioid users tended to have poorer overall health. Scores in the physical (33.3 vs 46.0) and mental (44.4 vs 49.9) component summaries of the 12-item Short Form health survey were significantly lower in users than in nonusers (p<0.001 for both). There was also a significantly greater proportion of users that rated their health as fair or poor (p<0.001).

When the participants were stratified according to levels of opioid use, the unadjusted models showed that moderate users (28.9 percent) reported significantly better satisfaction.

However, after complete adjustments for covariates, both moderate (adjusted OR, 1.55; 1.29–1.86) and heavy (41.9 percent; adjusted OR, 1.43; 1.20–1.70) users reported significantly higher satisfaction.

Moreover, each increase in the categories of opioid use level (none, low, moderate and heavy) resulted in a significant 15-percent increase in the likelihood of being in the highest quartile of satisfaction scores (p<0.001 for trend).

To measure satisfaction, the researchers accessed the participants’ responses in the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey, which the participants accomplished once a year. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between satisfaction with care and opioid use.

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Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
Elvira Manzano, 2 days ago
Cancer patients at risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) are less likely to experience recurrence with rivaroxaban compared with dalteparin, the Select-D trial has shown, ushering in a new standard of care (SoC) for cancer-related VTE.
6 days ago

It appears that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) secondary to both traditional and RA-related risk factors, a recent study has found.

Yesterday
Weight loss medications that have received the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval appear to confer only modest positive benefits for cardiometabolic risk profile, according to a study.