Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 11 Sep 2019

Beta-blockers could reduce mortality risk in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and moderate or moderately-severe renal dysfunction without causing harm, according to the BB-META-HF* trial presented at ESC 2019.

Elvira Manzano, 4 days ago

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), in an update of its 2013 recommendations, called on clinicians to offer risk-reducing medications to women who are at increased risk for breast cancer but at low risk for adverse effects.

Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
The use of SGLT-2* inhibitors was not associated with a higher risk of severe or nonsevere urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with DPP**-4 inhibitors or GLP-1*** receptor agonists, a population-based cohort study shows.
14 Sep 2019
In type 2 diabetes patients taking sulfonylureas, hypoglycaemia duration is longer at night and is inversely correlated with the level of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), a new study reports.

High-dose vitamin D supplementation fails to prevent respiratory infection in seniors

11 Sep 2019

Monthly supplementation with high-dose vitamin D does little to stave off the risk of developing acute respiratory infection (ARI) in older adults with low prevalence of profound vitamin D deficiency, a study has found.

Researchers randomized 5,110 adults aged 50–84 years (mean age, 66 years; 58 percent male; 83 percent of European/other descent) to receive an initial oral dose of 200,000 IU vitamin D3 followed by 100,000 IU monthly (n=2,558) or placebo (n=2,552) for a median of 1.6 years. Participants completed monthly questionnaires to report upper and lower ARIs.

Mean (SD) baseline blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) level was 63 nmol/L, with 25 percent of participants having <50 nmol/L. In a random sample of 441 individuals, mean 25OHD levels increased to 135 nmol/L with vitamin D supplementation at 3 years, but remained stable at 63 nmol/L with placebo.

During follow-up, at least one ARI occurred in 3,737 participants: 74.1 percent in the vitamin D group vs 73.7 percent in the placebo group. The difference in ARI risk was not significant between the two groups (hazard ratio, 1.01, 95 percent CI, 0.94–1.07).

Similar results were seen in most subgroups, including that defined by baseline 25OHD <50 nmol/L, and in analyses of the upper/lower components of the ARI outcome.

In light of the findings, the researchers do not recommend monthly dosing of vitamin D for the prevention of ARI.

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 11 Sep 2019

Beta-blockers could reduce mortality risk in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and moderate or moderately-severe renal dysfunction without causing harm, according to the BB-META-HF* trial presented at ESC 2019.

Elvira Manzano, 4 days ago

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), in an update of its 2013 recommendations, called on clinicians to offer risk-reducing medications to women who are at increased risk for breast cancer but at low risk for adverse effects.

Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
The use of SGLT-2* inhibitors was not associated with a higher risk of severe or nonsevere urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with DPP**-4 inhibitors or GLP-1*** receptor agonists, a population-based cohort study shows.
14 Sep 2019
In type 2 diabetes patients taking sulfonylureas, hypoglycaemia duration is longer at night and is inversely correlated with the level of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), a new study reports.