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Roshini Claire Anthony, 13 Nov 2020

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Tristan Manalac, 18 Nov 2020
The substitution of isoleucine to leucine at amino acid 97 (I97L) in the core region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) seems to reduce its potency, decreasing the efficiency of both infection and the synthesis of the virus’ covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA, reports a new study presented at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2020).

High dietary nicotine intake lowers risk of Parkinson disease in women

12 Oct 2020

Greater consumption of dietary nicotine reduces the risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD) in women, results of a study have shown.

This study was based on never-smoker participants from two large prospective cohorts: the Nurses’ Health Study (n=31,615) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n=19,523). These cohorts had available information on dietary nicotine intake from 1986 from validate food frequency questionnaires.

The investigators calculated dietary nicotine based on consumption of peppers, tomatoes, processed tomatoes, potatoes, and tea. Questionnaires were utilized to identify incident PD cases, which were subsequently confirmed by reviewing medical records. Cohort-specific hazard ratios (HRs) and pooled HR were calculated using Cox proportional hazard models and fixed-effects models, respectively.

A total of 601 incident PD cases (305 men and 296 women) were identified during 26 years of follow-up. The pooled HR after adjusting for potential covariates was 0.70 (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.51–0.94) for the highest vs lowest quintile of dietary nicotine intake. However, the inverse association was only observed in women (adjusted HR, 0.64, 95 percent CI, 0.42_0.96), not in men (adjusted HR, 0.77, 95 percent CI, 0.50–1.20).

Similar significant results in women were observed after further adjustments for environmental tobacco smoke exposure, family history of PD, and use of ibuprofen.

Notably, high peppers intake correlated with a lower risk of PD (adjusted HR for ≥5 times/week compared with ≤3 times/month, 0.49, 95 percent CI, 0.25–0.94) in women but not in men (adjusted HR, 1.04, 95 percent CI, 0.57–1.90).

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Most Read Articles
4 days ago
Ivermectin confers benefits in the treatment of COVID-19, with a recent study showing that its use helps reduce the risk of death especially in patients with severe pulmonary involvement.
3 days ago
Mental health comorbidities are common among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and may lead to worse outcomes, a recent study has found.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 13 Nov 2020

Diabetes is a key risk factor for heart failure (HF), which is the leading cause of hospitalization in patients with or without diabetes. SGLT-2* inhibitors (SGLT-2is) have been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization for HF (HHF) regardless of the presence or absence of diabetes.

Tristan Manalac, 18 Nov 2020
The substitution of isoleucine to leucine at amino acid 97 (I97L) in the core region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) seems to reduce its potency, decreasing the efficiency of both infection and the synthesis of the virus’ covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA, reports a new study presented at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2020).