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High dietary inflammatory index tied to increased cancer risk

11 Apr 2018
Global phenomenon: Bad diet is one of the causes of early death.

A significant association exists between higher dietary inflammatory index (DII) and risk of cancer, according to the results of a recent dose-response meta-analysis.

A total of 44 high-quality studies (n=1,082,092 participants) were included. An elevated DII (continuous–relative risk [RR], 1.13; 95 percent CI, 1.09–1.16; category DIIhighest vs lowest–RR, 1.58; 1.45–1.72) was independently associated with higher cancer risk, except for lung cancer and Australian studies.

There was a linear dose-response relation between DII and overall risk of cancer, with an 8.3-percent increase in cancer risk per DII score. The pooled RR of DII and cancer risk was 1.86 (1.63–2.13) from 30 case-control studies and 1.29 (1.19–1.40) from 14 prospective cohorts.

These findings were supported by both sensitivity analysis and Egger’s test.

The investigators conducted a dose-response meta-analysis to examine the association between DII and cancer incidence. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane library were systematically searched up to 5 November 2017.

After extracting data, the investigators calculated pooled RRs and performed dose-response analyses using a restricted cubic spline model with 4 knots. They also performed subgroup analyses, sensitivity analyses and tests for publication bias.

“More prospective studies with large sample sizes, involving more ethnic groups and different cancer types, are required in the future,” the investigators said.

“A newly developed DII to evaluate the inflammatory potential of diets was published recently. Many studies have investigated the link between diet-related inflammation and human cancer risk, but the results remain controversial,” they noted.

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Most Read Articles
4 days ago
Chocolate consumption is not associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke or both combined in postmenopausal women free of pre-existing major chronic disease, a study suggests.
Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
More intensive lowering of LDL-C levels was associated with a progressively greater survival benefit than less intensive approach, when the baseline LDL-C levels were ≥100 mg/dL, reveals a meta-analysis of 34 randomized trials.
4 days ago
Switching from thiazide diuretic to ipragliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, leads to improvements in metabolic parameters and body mass composition without affecting blood pressure in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients, a recent study has found.
2 days ago
Adolescents who sleep longer and have higher sleep efficiency have a favourable cardiometabolic profile, including lower abdominal adiposity, lower systolic blood pressure and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, as shown in a study.