Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 27 Mar 2020
Every-two-month injections of the long-acting cabotegravir + rilpivirine were noninferior to once-monthly injections for virologic suppression at 48 weeks in people living with HIV*, according to the ATLAS-2M** study presented at CROI 2020 — thus providing a potential option with more convenient dosing.
Stephen Padilla, 19 Mar 2020
The assumption that children are less vulnerable to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) compared to adults is not quite true and may even be dangerous, suggests a recent study.
22 Mar 2020
Sustained use of lopinavir-combined regimen appears to confer benefits among patients with the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), with improvement possibly indicated by increasing eosinophils, suggests a recent study.
24 Mar 2020
COVID-19 is a novel disease, with no existing immunity. The virus can be transmitted from person to person, quickly and exponentially. Here’s what we can do to slow down the spread, if not contain the outbreak.

High dietary GI ups risk of insomnia in postmenopausal women

21 Feb 2020

A diet with high glycaemic index (GI) may lead to insomnia among postmenopausal women, suggests a recent study.

Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses revealed an association between higher dietary GI and an increased risk for prevalent (fifth vs first quintile odds ratio [OR], 1.11, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.16; ptrend=0.0014) and incident (fifth vs first quintile OR, 1.16, 95 percent CI, 1.08–1.25; ptrend<0.0001) insomnia in fully adjusted models.

Moreover, increased consumption of dietary added sugars, starch and nonwhole/refined grains independently correlated with a higher risk of incident insomnia. On the other hand, higher intake of nonjuice fruit and vegetables significantly correlated with a reduced risk of incident insomnia.

Higher intakes of dietary fibre, whole grains, nonjuice fruit and vegetables also resulted in a significant reduction in prevalent insomnia risk.

“Substitution of high-GI foods with minimally processed, whole, fibre-rich carbohydrates should be evaluated as potential treatments of, and primary preventive measures for, insomnia in postmenopausal women,” the authors said.

This prospective cohort study involved postmenopausal women who participated in the Women’s Health Initiative Observation Study. The authors examined the associations of GI, glycaemic load, other carbohydrate measures (ie, added sugars, starch, total carbohydrate), dietary fibre, and specific carbohydrate-containing foods (ie, whole grains, nonwhole/refined grains, nonjuice fruits, vegetables, dairy products) with the risk of insomnia at baseline and after 3 years of follow-up.

“Previous studies have shown mixed results on the association between carbohydrate intake and insomnia,” the authors said. “However, any influence that refined carbohydrates have on risk of insomnia is likely commensurate with their relative contribution to the overall diet, so studies are needed that measure overall dietary GI, glycaemic load and intakes of specific types of carbohydrates.”

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Doctor - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 27 Mar 2020
Every-two-month injections of the long-acting cabotegravir + rilpivirine were noninferior to once-monthly injections for virologic suppression at 48 weeks in people living with HIV*, according to the ATLAS-2M** study presented at CROI 2020 — thus providing a potential option with more convenient dosing.
Stephen Padilla, 19 Mar 2020
The assumption that children are less vulnerable to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) compared to adults is not quite true and may even be dangerous, suggests a recent study.
22 Mar 2020
Sustained use of lopinavir-combined regimen appears to confer benefits among patients with the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), with improvement possibly indicated by increasing eosinophils, suggests a recent study.
24 Mar 2020
COVID-19 is a novel disease, with no existing immunity. The virus can be transmitted from person to person, quickly and exponentially. Here’s what we can do to slow down the spread, if not contain the outbreak.