Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 2 days ago

The combined use of piperacillin and tazobactam does not appear to be a suitable alternative to meropenem for patients with bloodstream infections caused by ceftriaxone-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), according to results of the MERINO* trial.

Tristan Manalac, 5 days ago
Taking oral antibiotics appears to increase the risk of nephrolithiasis, according to a recent study. Moreover, the risk seems to be compounded for individuals with recent antibiotic exposure and those who were exposed at a younger age.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 6 days ago
Male smokers under the age of 50 years are at risk of developing ischaemic stroke, and this risk increases with the number of cigarettes smoked daily, according to data from the Stroke Prevention in Young Men Study.
Yesterday
Early renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) leads to better short- and long-term renal outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with antiphospholipid-associated nephropathy (aPLN), according to a study, adding that this renal protective effect is independent of RASI’s antihypertensive and antiproteinuric effects.

Heart failure symptoms common in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia

02 Oct 2017

Symptoms of heart failure (HF), especially exertional dyspnoea, are common in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D), a new study has shown.

“Given the unique predominately right-sided phenotype, a large portion of patients with HF may be under-recognized,” said researchers.

In the study sample of 289 ARVC/D patients (mean age of presentation 34±14 years), 142 had clinical HF while the remaining 147 did not. Isolated right ventricle involvement was documented in 80 percent (n=113) of the patients with HF.

Of the 142 patients who had clinical HF, a further 59 percent (n=84) had at least two symptoms while 27 percent (n=38) had at least three.

The most common symptom was dyspnoea on exertion, which was recorded in 78 percent (n=108) of the HF patients. This was followed by fatigue (73 percent; n=94), abdominal swelling (31 percent; n=36) and lower extremity swelling (28 percent; n=38).

Oedema or ascites, collectively defined in the study as volume overload, was observed in 57 patients (40 percent).

In contrast, left-sided symptoms were rare, the most common one being orthopnoea, which was observed only in 9 percent of the HF patients. This was followed by paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea (6 percent) and pulmonary rales (2 percent).

Moreover, while patients with clinical HF were significantly more likely to undergo heart transplantation (p<0.001), those with symptomatic left ventricular presentations were significantly more likely to receive it than those without (p=0.008).

Patients with heart failure (p=0.007), particularly those with left ventricle dysfunction (p=0.013), also had a higher risk of dying during follow-up.

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 2 days ago

The combined use of piperacillin and tazobactam does not appear to be a suitable alternative to meropenem for patients with bloodstream infections caused by ceftriaxone-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), according to results of the MERINO* trial.

Tristan Manalac, 5 days ago
Taking oral antibiotics appears to increase the risk of nephrolithiasis, according to a recent study. Moreover, the risk seems to be compounded for individuals with recent antibiotic exposure and those who were exposed at a younger age.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 6 days ago
Male smokers under the age of 50 years are at risk of developing ischaemic stroke, and this risk increases with the number of cigarettes smoked daily, according to data from the Stroke Prevention in Young Men Study.
Yesterday
Early renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) leads to better short- and long-term renal outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with antiphospholipid-associated nephropathy (aPLN), according to a study, adding that this renal protective effect is independent of RASI’s antihypertensive and antiproteinuric effects.