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Healthy diet prevents wrinkling in women

28 Apr 2019
Scientists have recently invented what they call the "second skin" which makes wrinkles disappear and bags under the eys vanish.

Women who adopt healthy diets appear to have less severe facial wrinkles, according to a new Dutch study.

The study included 2,753 elderly adults (median age, 67.3 years; 59 percent female), in whom facial photographs were used for the digital quantification of wrinkles. A Food Frequency Questionnaire was used to assess diet quality and adherence to the Dutch Healthy Diet Index (DHDI). Principal component analysis (PCA) was also performed to identify patterns of food consumption in men and women, separately.

PCA identified three diet patterns that were similar between men and women. The first was characterized as having high intake levels of healthy foods, such as vegetables, fish, poultry, nuts and seeds, as well as being enriched in wine consumption.

The second food pattern was characterized as mostly unhealthy, being high in meat, grains, snacks, coffee, soft drinks and other alcoholic drinks. The third pattern was an intermediate between the first two and resembled a typical Dutch diet. It was rich in cheeses, grains, fats and potatoes.

A fourth pattern also emerged but was apparent in women alone. It was characterized as being high in fruits, yoghurt, milk and some vegetables.

Notably, women who had high DHDI scores, indicating better diet quality, showed significantly less facial wrinkles (percentage change, –4.48 percent; 95 percent CI, –7.58 to –1.36; p=0.005). The same was true for the final dietary pattern, which was high in fruits (percentage change, –3.20 percent; –6.25 to –0.06; p=0.046).

In contrast, those who adopted the second and most unhealthy dietary pattern had more facial wrinkles (percentage change, 3.32 percent; 0.06–6.68; p=0.046).

No such effects in women were observed for the healthiest and the intermediate dietary patterns, nor were there any significant interactions between any of the dietary patterns and facial wrinkles in men.

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Roshini Claire Anthony, 3 days ago

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