Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 3 days ago

The combined use of piperacillin and tazobactam does not appear to be a suitable alternative to meropenem for patients with bloodstream infections caused by ceftriaxone-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), according to results of the MERINO* trial.

Tristan Manalac, 6 days ago
Taking oral antibiotics appears to increase the risk of nephrolithiasis, according to a recent study. Moreover, the risk seems to be compounded for individuals with recent antibiotic exposure and those who were exposed at a younger age.
Yesterday
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk of developing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure, although the prevalence of traditional risk factors for such cardiovascular disorders appears to be low, as reported in a recent study.
2 days ago
Early renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) leads to better short- and long-term renal outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with antiphospholipid-associated nephropathy (aPLN), according to a study, adding that this renal protective effect is independent of RASI’s antihypertensive and antiproteinuric effects.

Gene score predicts prostate cancer risk

18 Jan 2018

A polygenic hazard score appears to accurately estimate genetic risk and predict age at onset of aggressive prostate cancer, a recent study shows.

Using single nucleotide polymorphisms of 31,747 males, the researchers developed a polygenic hazard score to assess individual prostate cancer genetic risk and applied it to a cohort of 6,411 males. The main outcome was the predictive accuracy for age of onset of aggressive malignancy in the validation cohort.

According to a Cox proportional hazards model, the polygenic hazard score showed significant predictive ability for the age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer (z=11.2; p<10-16), any prostate cancer (z=15.4; p<10-16) and very aggressive prostate cancer (z=6.8; p<10-11).

Those in the >98th percentile of polygenic hazard scores were identified as high-risk patients and showed significantly higher risks of any prostate cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 2.5; 95 percent CI, 2.2–2.8), aggressive disease (HR, 3.0; 2.2–4.0) and early age of onset (HR, 2.9; 2.4–3.4).

A model developed using only aggressive prostate cancer cases also showed significant predictive value but did not outperform the original model (z=9.4; p<10-16; HR, 2.6; 2.1–3.1).

In a subsequent Cox test performed on patients with known family history statuses, there was no correlation between age of onset of aggressive disease and family history (z=0.9; p=0.37; HR, 1.1; 0.9–1.4).

Inclusion of family history in the model did not improve the predictive value over the original polygenic hazard score for any prostate cancer (p=0.14) or aggressive prostate cancer (p=0.59).

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Doctor - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 3 days ago

The combined use of piperacillin and tazobactam does not appear to be a suitable alternative to meropenem for patients with bloodstream infections caused by ceftriaxone-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), according to results of the MERINO* trial.

Tristan Manalac, 6 days ago
Taking oral antibiotics appears to increase the risk of nephrolithiasis, according to a recent study. Moreover, the risk seems to be compounded for individuals with recent antibiotic exposure and those who were exposed at a younger age.
Yesterday
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk of developing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure, although the prevalence of traditional risk factors for such cardiovascular disorders appears to be low, as reported in a recent study.
2 days ago
Early renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) leads to better short- and long-term renal outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with antiphospholipid-associated nephropathy (aPLN), according to a study, adding that this renal protective effect is independent of RASI’s antihypertensive and antiproteinuric effects.