Most Read Articles
3 days ago
Combining the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet with low sodium intake reduces systolic blood pressure (SBP) in individuals with pre- and stage 1 hypertension, with progressively higher reductions at greater levels of baseline SBP, a recent study has shown.
5 days ago
Cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder are neurodevelopmental rather than neurodegenerative in nature, a recent study has reported. Furthermore, cognitive impairment in bipolar patients appears to be stable, in the majority at least.
2 days ago
Tadalafil may not be effective for reducing the decline in ambulatory ability in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), as shown in a recent study.
5 days ago
Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) appears to significantly increase the risks of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), particularly squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a recent study has shown.

Functional outcomes poorer in women than in men after ischaemic stroke

23 Sep 2017

While in-hospital mortality rate from ischaemic stroke is comparable between males and females, functional outcomes are poorer at discharge and at 6 months in females, a new study has shown.

In the study sample of 4,278 ischaemic stroke patients (mean age 69.9±12.12 years; 41.1 percent female), in-hospital mortality rates were found to be significantly elevated in females compared with males (p<0.01) based on univariate analysis.

However, after adjusting for age, risk factors and severity of stroke, the significant difference in mortality was attenuated (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95 percent CI, 0.66 to 1.93).

Univariate analysis also revealed that age >75 years elevated the risk of in-hospital mortality for females only, while stroke severity and increased intracranial pressure raised the risk for both sexes.

Multivariate analysis showed that cardioembolism stroke (OR, 0.35; 0.15 to 0.81; p=0.01) and atrial fibrillation (OR, 2.84; 1.38 to 5.85; p<0.01) significantly increased the risk of in-hospital mortality in females, but not in males.

Good outcomes 6 months after the stroke event were observed in 56.1 percent (n=1,813) of patients. Analysis by gender showed that only 47.4 percent (n=629) of females reported good outcomes as compared to 62.2 percent (n=1,184) of males. The difference reached statistical significance (p<0.01).

Old age (>75 years; p<0.01) significantly correlated with more severe strokes and hypertension (p=0.05) with poorer overall outcomes in females but not in males.

In contrast, diabetes mellitus significantly correlated with disease severity (p=0.04), neurological deterioration (p=0.05) and haemorrhagic transformation (p=0.03) in males only. Poor disease outcome was significantly associated with diabetes mellitus in both sexes (p<0.01 for both).

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Doctor - Malaysia digital copy today!
DOWNLOAD
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
3 days ago
Combining the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet with low sodium intake reduces systolic blood pressure (SBP) in individuals with pre- and stage 1 hypertension, with progressively higher reductions at greater levels of baseline SBP, a recent study has shown.
5 days ago
Cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder are neurodevelopmental rather than neurodegenerative in nature, a recent study has reported. Furthermore, cognitive impairment in bipolar patients appears to be stable, in the majority at least.
2 days ago
Tadalafil may not be effective for reducing the decline in ambulatory ability in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), as shown in a recent study.
5 days ago
Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) appears to significantly increase the risks of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), particularly squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a recent study has shown.