Most Read Articles
4 days ago
Prenatal and postpartum vitamin D supplementation does not appear to improve foetal or infant growth, a study reports.
6 days ago
Excessive daytime sleepiness appears to increase the long-term risk of amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, a recent study has shown.
6 days ago
Substituting diets high in carbohydrates with those high in monounsaturated fatty acids in the context of low saturated fatty acids do not appear to yield favourable effects on blood pressure, according to a meta-analysis.
2 days ago
Patients with chronic kidney disease appear to be at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) compared with the general population, with predictors including poor baseline glycaemic control and family history of diabetes mellitus, a study has found.

Foot stimulation reduces bedwetting frequency among children with nocturnal enuresis

10 Nov 2016

Transcutaneous foot stimulation shows utility as a non-invasive, at-home treatment for reducing the number of bedwetting episodes in children with nocturnal enuresis, according to a recent study.

A total of 22 paediatric patients (mean age 11.4 years) with ≥2 bedwetting episodes per week for at least 3 consecutive months were included in the study. All patients received a 60-minute session of stimulation of peripheral tibial nerve branches nightly for 2 weeks.

The patients kept a nighttime voiding diary for 6 weeks: 2 weeks prior to the stimulation, 2 weeks during the intervention, and 2 weeks post-stimulation.

Overall, the intervention produced a significant reduction in mean total wet nights from 9 at baseline to 6.8 during the stimulation period (p<0.01). This reduction was sustained during the post-stimulation period (7.2 wet nights; p=0.02).

A reduction of at least 1 episode of bedwetting occurred in 72.7 percent of the patients during the stimulation period. The mean number of wet nights improved from 7.9 to 4.8 (p<0.01). The improvement was maintained at a mean of 5.1 during the post-stimulation period (p<0.01).

The beneficial effect of electrical stimulation of somatic afferent pathways (in the pudendal nerve, posterior tibial nerve, or sacral spinal roots) on bladder activity is well-established. This method has been shown to be effective in both humans and animals. However, sacral and pudendal neuromodulation involves a stimulator implant, while tibial nerve neuromodulation requires percutaneous insertion of a needle electrode cephalad to the medial malleolus. These treatments are inconvenient and costly. [BJUI 2011;107;303–309]

The current data highlight the potential of noninvasive transcutaneous stimulation of somatic nerves in the foot in the management of nocturnal enuresis in children.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Doctor - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
4 days ago
Prenatal and postpartum vitamin D supplementation does not appear to improve foetal or infant growth, a study reports.
6 days ago
Excessive daytime sleepiness appears to increase the long-term risk of amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, a recent study has shown.
6 days ago
Substituting diets high in carbohydrates with those high in monounsaturated fatty acids in the context of low saturated fatty acids do not appear to yield favourable effects on blood pressure, according to a meta-analysis.
2 days ago
Patients with chronic kidney disease appear to be at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) compared with the general population, with predictors including poor baseline glycaemic control and family history of diabetes mellitus, a study has found.