Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 29 May 2020

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

3 days ago
Use of metformin is effective in preventing hyperglycaemia in nondiabetic cancer patients exposed to high-dose prednisone-based chemotherapy, results of a randomized study have shown.
6 days ago
Use of corticosteroid is not associated with improved outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients admitted to the hospital with acute exacerbation (AE), reveals a recent study. In addition, corticosteroids may even contribute to reduced overall survival following exacerbation.
Dr. Wong Soon Tee, 28 May 2020
Acne is a common skin problem seen in primary care. Dr Wong Soon Tee of Assurance Skin Clinic at Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Singapore shares his insights with Pearl Toh on how to manage acne in the primary care setting.

Etrasimod shows promise for moderately, severely active ulcerative colitis

29 Feb 2020

Etrasimod may be a potential treatment for moderately-to-severely active ulcerative colitis, though further examinations are needed, a recent study has found.

Researchers randomly assigned 156 patients to receive either etrasimod 1 mg (n=52; mean age, 43.2±12.22 years; 57.7 percent male) or 2 mg (n=50; mean age, 40.4±12.39 years; 54.0 percent male) or placebo (n=54; mean age, 44.8±14.85 years; 59.3 percent male) for 12 weeks. The primary study endpoint was an increase in the improvement of modified Mayo Clinic scores (MCS) from baseline. Only patients with moderate-to-severe disease were eligible.

At week 12, the etrasimod 1-mg, 2-mg and placebo groups had showed least mean squares (LSM) improvements in modified MCS scores of 1.94±0.31, 2.49±0.31 and 1.50±0.30, respectively. Only the higher etrasimod dose resulted in a significant difference relative to placebo (p=0.009). This was robust to sensitivity analyses.

Moreover, a significantly larger percentage of patients taking 2-mg etrasimod achieved endoscopic improvement relative to placebo (41.8 percent vs 17.8 percent; p=0.003). The effect of the lower dose again failed to achieve significance (difference vs placebo, 4.1 percent; p=0.31).

The total MCS score was also improved to a significantly greater degree in the 2-mg etrasimod vs placebo (LSM difference, 1.27, 90 percent confidence interval, 0.37–2.17; p=0.01). No such effect was observed for the 1-mg dose (LSM difference, 0.60; p=0.13).

“The current study has some limitations. First, this induction study was only 12 weeks in duration, and the safety and efficacy during longer-term maintenance therapy remain to be elucidated. Second, a larger sample size is needed to fully determine the safety profile of etrasimod,” the researchers said.

“The safety and efficacy of etrasimod should be further characterized in phase III clinical studies,” they added.

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 29 May 2020

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

3 days ago
Use of metformin is effective in preventing hyperglycaemia in nondiabetic cancer patients exposed to high-dose prednisone-based chemotherapy, results of a randomized study have shown.
6 days ago
Use of corticosteroid is not associated with improved outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients admitted to the hospital with acute exacerbation (AE), reveals a recent study. In addition, corticosteroids may even contribute to reduced overall survival following exacerbation.
Dr. Wong Soon Tee, 28 May 2020
Acne is a common skin problem seen in primary care. Dr Wong Soon Tee of Assurance Skin Clinic at Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Singapore shares his insights with Pearl Toh on how to manage acne in the primary care setting.