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Energy intake reductions predict greater weight loss after bariatric surgery

05 Aug 2017
There are many much beloved sources of carbohydrates we can taste, according to new findings

A predictor of long-term weight loss is the level of energy restriction achieved at 0.5 years after bariatric surgery, according to a study, adding that weight loss correlates with a changing dietary macronutrient composition.

Short-term changes in energy intake (p<0.001) and in relative proportions of energy from carbohydrates (p<0.001), fat (p<0.001) and protein (p<0.05) correlated with 10-year weight change after bariatric surgery.

During the 10-year follow-up, men and women with the largest reductions in energy intake had greater weight loss (7.3 and 3.9 percent, respectively) than those with the smallest intake reductions (p<0.001).

Furthermore, men and women who favoured protein and carbohydrates over fat and those who favoured protein over carbohydrates had lost more weight than individuals who favoured the opposite changes in macronutrient composition (p<0.05).

To determine whether short-term changes (≤0.5 year postsurgery) in energy intake and macronutrient composition after bariatric surgery could predict 10-year weight change, researchers recruited participants from the Swedish Obese Subjects study, a matched, nonrandomized, prospective trial comparing bariatric surgery with usual care for obese patients.

Included in the study were 2,010 patients who underwent bariatric surgery. They completed physical examinations and questionnaires before and 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10 years after surgery. A linear mixed model was used for analysis, including repeated measures with a random intercept and an unstructured covariance matrix.

“Approximately 20 to 30 percent of obese patients do not achieve successful weight outcomes after bariatric surgery,” according to researchers.

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Most Read Articles
4 days ago
Combining the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet with low sodium intake reduces systolic blood pressure (SBP) in individuals with pre- and stage 1 hypertension, with progressively higher reductions at greater levels of baseline SBP, a recent study has shown.
Tristan Manalac, 2 days ago
Major depressive disorder (MDD) appears to be more prevalent in females than in males, particularly in those who are divorced or widowed, a recent study from Singapore has found.
3 days ago
Tadalafil may not be effective for reducing the decline in ambulatory ability in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), as shown in a recent study.
6 days ago
Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) appears to significantly increase the risks of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), particularly squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a recent study has shown.