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Roshini Claire Anthony, 3 days ago

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05 Feb 2021

Primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) and allergies are two groups of conditions related to the immune system. However, they are uniquely different in terms of symptoms and treatment.

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Eating in front of TV, skipping meal tied to low self-esteem in children

15 Feb 2021

Meal regularity shows a significant and consistent association with self-esteem, suggests a recent study involving grade 5 children.

“Meal regularity is associated with many aspects of mental health,” the authors said.

Using the Harvard Youth/Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire, the authors collected cross-sectional meal regularity survey data (family supper, supper in front of the television, supper alone, skipping breakfast, and skipping lunch) among 4,009 grade 5 students (mean age, 11.0 years) from the 2011 Children’s Lifestyle and School Performance Study in Canada and examined these indicators in relation to self-esteem.

Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 percent confidence intervals (CIs) associated with low self-esteem were calculated using multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression. Analyses were then stratified by sex and adjusted for sociodemographic and lifestyle covariates.

Children who ate supper in front of the television 5 times/week were more likely to have low self-esteem (OR, 1.85, 95 percent CI, 1.40–2.43) than those who ate supper in front of the television or alone either never or less than once a week.

In addition, children who never ate family supper or less than once a week had greater odds of low self-esteem (OR, 1.97, 95 percent CI, 1.51–2.56) compared to those who ate family supper 5 times/week, as did children who skipped breakfast (OR, 2.92, 95 percent CI, 1.87–4.57) and lunch (OR, 4.82, 95 percent CI, 2.14–10.87).

These findings showed that a relationship exists between meal regularity and self-esteem in children.

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 3 days ago

The addition of methylprednisolone to standard care* reduced mortality risk in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), according to a study from China.

05 Feb 2021

Primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) and allergies are two groups of conditions related to the immune system. However, they are uniquely different in terms of symptoms and treatment.

Pearl Toh, 26 Nov 2020
Inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) should be the mainstay of long-term asthma management — such is the key message of the latest Singapore ACE* Clinical Guidance (ACG) for asthma, released in October 2020.
Stephen Padilla, 3 days ago
High-flow oxygen is not associated with an increase or a decrease in 30-day mortality, suggesting no benefit in most patients presenting with a suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS), reports a New Zealand study.