Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 29 May 2020

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

5 days ago
Use of corticosteroid is not associated with improved outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients admitted to the hospital with acute exacerbation (AE), reveals a recent study. In addition, corticosteroids may even contribute to reduced overall survival following exacerbation.
Dr. Wong Soon Tee, 28 May 2020
Acne is a common skin problem seen in primary care. Dr Wong Soon Tee of Assurance Skin Clinic at Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Singapore shares his insights with Pearl Toh on how to manage acne in the primary care setting.
27 May 2020
The perception that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) cause multiple serious adverse effects (AEs) is supported by many internists, who then recommend treatment cessation even in patients at high risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), reveals a study.

Eating fish twice a week may help prevent multiple sclerosis

22 May 2020
Regular consumption of oily fish such as salmon is sufficient for a regular healthy person.

Higher consumption of fish appears to lower the risk of first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (FCD), a common precursor to multiple sclerosis (MS), reveals a study.

Tinned fish is mostly oily, while grilled and fried fish are likely to be oily and white types. Oily fish is rich in vitamin D and very long chain polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, which are both helpful in preventing MS, according to the investigators.

The Ausimmune Study, a case-control study that examined environmental risk factors for FCD from 2003 to 2006, recruited participants from four regions of Australia and matched them based on age, sex and study region. A food frequency questionnaire was used to collect data on dietary intake.

The investigators used conditional logistic regression models to examine the association between fish (total, tinned, grilled and fried) and risk of FCD (249 cases and 438 controls), adjusting for history of infectious mononucleosis, smoking, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, socioeconomic status, omega-3 supplement use, dietary under-reporting and total energy intake.

Higher total fish consumption (per 30 g/day, equivalent to two serves/week) resulted in an 18-percent reduction in the risk of FCD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.82, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.70–0.97). No statistically significant associations were observed between consumptions of grilled or fried fish and risk of FCD, but higher tinned fish consumption (per 30 g/day) led to a 41-percent reduction in FCD risk (aOR, 0.59, 95 percent CI, 0.39–0.89).

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 29 May 2020

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

5 days ago
Use of corticosteroid is not associated with improved outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients admitted to the hospital with acute exacerbation (AE), reveals a recent study. In addition, corticosteroids may even contribute to reduced overall survival following exacerbation.
Dr. Wong Soon Tee, 28 May 2020
Acne is a common skin problem seen in primary care. Dr Wong Soon Tee of Assurance Skin Clinic at Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Singapore shares his insights with Pearl Toh on how to manage acne in the primary care setting.
27 May 2020
The perception that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) cause multiple serious adverse effects (AEs) is supported by many internists, who then recommend treatment cessation even in patients at high risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), reveals a study.