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Stephen Padilla, Yesterday
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Pank Jit Sin, 21 May 2020

Persons suffering from asthma should pay particular attention to SARS-CoV-2 precautionary measures such as social distancing, regular handwashing, and wearing of masks on top of keeping their asthma in control. This is because data collected so far paints a bleaker picture for asthmatics than the normal population should they catch COVID-19.

Early menarche tied to lower adult lung function

27 Feb 2020

An association exists between early menarche and lower adult lung function, suggests a recent study.

“This is the first study to investigate postbronchodilator (post-BD) outcomes and quantify the partial role of adult height in this association,” the authors claimed.

Girls who experienced early menarche (<12 years), compared with those reporting menarche ≥12 years, were taller in height and had greater lung function at age 7 years. However, by age 45 years, they were shorter and had lower post-BD forced expiratory volume in 1 s (adjusted mean difference [aMD], –133 mL, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], –233 to –33), forced vital capacity (aMD, –183 mL, 95 percent CI, –300 to –65) and functional residual capacity (aMD, –168 mL, 95 percent CI, –315 to –21).

At age 53 years, there were similar magnitudes of spirometric deficits observed. Nearly half (40 percent) of these total effects were facilitated through adult-attained height.

Started in 1968, the population-based Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study enrolled 8,583 participants (born 1961). The 5th Decade follow-up date (mean age, 45 years) included age at menarche and complex lung functions testing, and the 6th Decade follow-up (mean age, 53 years) repeated spirometry and gas transfer factor.

The authors carried out multiple linear regression and mediation analyses to determine the link between age at menarche and adult lung functions, as well as examine biological pathways, including the proportion mediated by adult-attained height.

“Early menarche is increasing in prevalence worldwide, prompting clinical and public health interest on its links with pulmonary function,” the authors noted.

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Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, Yesterday
Use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV), similar to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), appears to lessen mortality but may increase the risk for transmission of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in healthcare workers, suggest the results of a study.
14 May 2020
Webcast: Covid-19: What it means to your clinic. Practice pearls for the Asian primary care physician.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 08 May 2020

At present, there are no definitive treatments for COVID-19. More than 300 clinical trials are ongoing in the search for a cure. Some of the treatments being tested were previously used, with varying levels of efficacy, in the treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

Pank Jit Sin, 21 May 2020

Persons suffering from asthma should pay particular attention to SARS-CoV-2 precautionary measures such as social distancing, regular handwashing, and wearing of masks on top of keeping their asthma in control. This is because data collected so far paints a bleaker picture for asthmatics than the normal population should they catch COVID-19.