Most Read Articles
20 hours ago
In advanced-stage, newly diagnosed classical, CD30-positive Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), front-line therapy has resulted in durable remission rates in up to 70–90% of patients, although approximately 25–30% of advanced stage HL patients are refractory or relapse following first-line treatment with ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) chemotherapy.1–3 The standard of care for patients with relapsed or refractory (r/r) classical HL is salvage therapy using second-line high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT), followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplant (ASCT) in eligible patients, which can induce a complete remission (CR) in about 50% of patients.4 Nevertheless, the prognosis of patients who relapse after the salvage HDCT/ASCT is exceedingly poor, with a median survival duration of approximately 1.2 years.5
22 Jan 2018
In a symposium chaired by Dr Yoon-Sim Yap of the National Cancer Centre Singapore, renowned regional and international experts in the field of breast cancer, Dr Yen-Shen Lu from Taiwan and Professor Nadia Harbeck from Germany, joined her in providing insights on the current treatment landscape of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer. In their respective sessions, they each highlighted new therapeutic options including the optimal use of dual blockade therapy for oestrogenreceptor-positive (ER+) advanced breast cancer for patients in Asia. 

Early abiraterone acetate treatment improves outcomes in CRPC patients

28 Feb 2018

In chemotherapy-naïve castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients, first- and second-line administration of abiraterone acetate (AA) treatment leads to favourable outcomes, a recent Japan study suggests.

Researchers retrospectively analysed the records of 69 CRPC patients who received AA treatment and classified them into two: the early group, who received AA as first- or second-line treatment (n=24), and the deferred group, who received AA as a third-line or later treatment (n=45).

In unadjusted analyses, only the timing of AA treatment was significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS), such that those in the early group had better outcomes than those in the deferred group (hazard ratio [HR], 3.29; 95 percent CI, 1.66–6.51; p<0.001).

Adjusting for potential confounders did not attenuate the relationship. Although to a slightly lesser degree, early AA treatment remained significantly correlated with better PFS outcomes (HR, 2.99; 1.35–6.64; p<0.01).

Within the early group, there were no significant differences in outcomes between those who received AA as first- or second-line treatment. That is, patients treated first- or second-line treatment were statistically comparable in terms of prostate-specific antigen response, overall survival and PFS. All participants who received AA as second-line treatment were given flutamide as first-line therapy.

Five patients reported grade 3 adverse events, three of whom had hepatic function. Hypokalaemia and thrombocytopaenia were reported in one patient each. Other adverse events reported were either grade 1 or 2, the most common of which was an increase in alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase levels.

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Most Read Articles
20 hours ago
In advanced-stage, newly diagnosed classical, CD30-positive Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), front-line therapy has resulted in durable remission rates in up to 70–90% of patients, although approximately 25–30% of advanced stage HL patients are refractory or relapse following first-line treatment with ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) chemotherapy.1–3 The standard of care for patients with relapsed or refractory (r/r) classical HL is salvage therapy using second-line high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT), followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplant (ASCT) in eligible patients, which can induce a complete remission (CR) in about 50% of patients.4 Nevertheless, the prognosis of patients who relapse after the salvage HDCT/ASCT is exceedingly poor, with a median survival duration of approximately 1.2 years.5
22 Jan 2018
In a symposium chaired by Dr Yoon-Sim Yap of the National Cancer Centre Singapore, renowned regional and international experts in the field of breast cancer, Dr Yen-Shen Lu from Taiwan and Professor Nadia Harbeck from Germany, joined her in providing insights on the current treatment landscape of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer. In their respective sessions, they each highlighted new therapeutic options including the optimal use of dual blockade therapy for oestrogenreceptor-positive (ER+) advanced breast cancer for patients in Asia.