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Drinking coffee may promote longevity

11 Jul 2017

No association exists between regular coffee consumption and an increased mortality rate in either men or women, according to a recent study.

The relative risks (RRs) for all-cause mortality in men across coffee intake categories (<1 cup per month, 1 cup per month to 4 cups per week, 5 to 7 cups per week, 2 to 3 cups per day, 4 to 5 cups per day, and ≥6 cups per day) were 1.0, 1.07 (95 percent CI, 0.99 to 1.16), 1.02 (0.95 to 1.11), 0.97 (0.89 to 1.05), 0.93 (0.81 to 1.07) and 0.80 (0.62 to 1.04), respectively (p=0.008 for trend), after adjustment for age, smoking, and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer risk factors.

The RRs in women were 1.0, 0.98 (0.91 to 1.05), 0.93 (0.87 to 0.98), 0.82 (0.77 to 0.87), 0.74 (0.68 to 0.81) and 0.83 (0.73 to 0.95), respectively (p<0.001 for trend).

The inverse association was independent of caffeine consumption and was primarily due to a moderately reduced risk for CVD mortality. On the other hand, after adjustment for potential confounders, no statistically significant association was found between coffee intake and risk for cancer mortality.

In addition, decaffeinated coffee consumption was associated with a small reduction in all-cause and CVD mortality.

Using sex-specific Cox proportional hazard models, researchers investigated the association between coffee consumption and mortality during 18 years of follow-up in men (n=41,736) and 24 years of follow-up in women (n=86,214).

The study was limited by self-reporting of coffee consumption, which might have contributed to measurement error.

“The possibility of a modest benefit of coffee consumption on all-cause and CVD mortality needs to be further investigated,” researchers said.

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 4 days ago

The combined use of piperacillin and tazobactam does not appear to be a suitable alternative to meropenem for patients with bloodstream infections caused by ceftriaxone-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), according to results of the MERINO* trial.

Tristan Manalac, 19 May 2018
Taking oral antibiotics appears to increase the risk of nephrolithiasis, according to a recent study. Moreover, the risk seems to be compounded for individuals with recent antibiotic exposure and those who were exposed at a younger age.
2 days ago
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk of developing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure, although the prevalence of traditional risk factors for such cardiovascular disorders appears to be low, as reported in a recent study.
3 days ago
Early renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) leads to better short- and long-term renal outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with antiphospholipid-associated nephropathy (aPLN), according to a study, adding that this renal protective effect is independent of RASI’s antihypertensive and antiproteinuric effects.