Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 29 May 2020

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

4 days ago
Use of corticosteroid is not associated with improved outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients admitted to the hospital with acute exacerbation (AE), reveals a recent study. In addition, corticosteroids may even contribute to reduced overall survival following exacerbation.
Dr. Wong Soon Tee, 28 May 2020
Acne is a common skin problem seen in primary care. Dr Wong Soon Tee of Assurance Skin Clinic at Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Singapore shares his insights with Pearl Toh on how to manage acne in the primary care setting.
27 May 2020
The perception that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) cause multiple serious adverse effects (AEs) is supported by many internists, who then recommend treatment cessation even in patients at high risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), reveals a study.

DOAC screening service reduces dosing errors, improves medication access

16 May 2020

Implementing a direct oral anticoagulation (DOAC) screening service at a large academic medical centre provides patient education and results in improved medication access, improved follow-up, and the identification and resolution of dosing errors, according to a study.

A pharmacist-led antithrombosis clinic started a clinical service to provide oversight for all prescribed DOACs. This was done by using a daily electronic prescribing report of DOAC prescriptions. Clinical pharmacists then reviewed prescriptions to assess patient insurance, eligibility and accuracy of prescribed doses.

In total, 317 new prescriptions and 595 refill prescriptions were reviewed in the first year since service implementation in April 2016. A DOAC service pharmacist contacted 125 (39.4 percent) of 317 patients regarding their new prescription and 59 (9.9 percent) of 595 refill patients to provide education and follow-up on management as needed. Seventy-nine (28 percent) new prescriptions and 86 (14.5 percent) refill prescriptions received interventions.

For the new prescriptions, common interventions performed were contacting the prescriber for a medication or dose change (25.4 percent), assistance with medication access (21.5 percent), and coordinating appropriate lab and provider follow-up (21.5 percent). Common interventions with refill prescriptions included recommending appropriate follow-up (50 percent) and contacting the prescriber for medication or dosage change (24.4 percent).

These findings were consistent with those of a 2017 study which reported that a pharmacist-led DOAC service increased appropriate dosing of DOACs at baseline and follow-up as well as patient adherence to therapy. [Am J Health Syst Pharm 2017;74:483-489]

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 29 May 2020

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

4 days ago
Use of corticosteroid is not associated with improved outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients admitted to the hospital with acute exacerbation (AE), reveals a recent study. In addition, corticosteroids may even contribute to reduced overall survival following exacerbation.
Dr. Wong Soon Tee, 28 May 2020
Acne is a common skin problem seen in primary care. Dr Wong Soon Tee of Assurance Skin Clinic at Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Singapore shares his insights with Pearl Toh on how to manage acne in the primary care setting.
27 May 2020
The perception that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) cause multiple serious adverse effects (AEs) is supported by many internists, who then recommend treatment cessation even in patients at high risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), reveals a study.