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Daytime work may contribute to visceral fat accumulation in male workers

10 Mar 2020

Lack of regular exercise contributes to visceral fat accumulation in middle-aged men, as does keeping regular daytime work, as opposed to shift work, reports a new study.

A total of 10,073 male employees (mean age, 46.6±8.1 years) undergoing periodic health check-ups were included. Outcomes included visceral fat area (VFA), measured using computed tomography, and atherosclerosis, assessed through the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), carotid- intima-media thickness (IMT) and carotid plaque. Lifestyle factors were set as independent factors.

Of the participants, 6,235 kept fixed daytime jobs, while 3,838 were shift workers. VFA and CAVI were both significantly higher in daytime workers, while mean IMT was lower. Metabolic syndrome was present in comparable rates in either group.

Multivariate regression analysis revealed that fixed daytime work was a significant risk factor for visceral fat obesity (VFA 100 cm3; odds ratio [OR], 1.189, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.033–1.368; p<0.05), while having mainly physical work was not (OR, 1.011, 95 percent CI, 0.881–1.160; p=0.770).

Other significant lifestyle risk factors included night-time eating (OR, 1.165, 95 percent CI, 1.041–1.303; p<0.01) and habitual drinking (OR, 1.201, 95 percent CI, 1.058–1.364; p<0.01). Regular exercise, on the other hand, appeared to be significantly protective (OR, 0.818, 95 percent CI, 0.730–0.916; p<0.001).

“These findings support the hypothesis that lifestyle modification has a greater impact on health than intervention in working life in middle-aged workers,” said researchers. “Further investigations with a longitudinal design are necessary to draw definite conclusions from these results.”

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 3 days ago

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

5 days ago
Eating behaviours have been shown to moderate the relationship between cumulated risk factors in the first 1,000 days and adiposity outcomes at 6 years of age, which underscores modifiable behavioural targets for interventions, reports a study.
Stephen Padilla, 4 days ago
Use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV), similar to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), appears to lessen mortality but may increase the risk for transmission of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in healthcare workers, suggest the results of a study.
Tristan Manalac, 25 May 2020
Minimally invasive pancreatectomy (MIP) offers a feasible alternative to open pancreatectomy (OP) for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNEN), according to a recent Singapore study has found.