Most Read Articles
Natalia Reoutova, 20 May 2020

Cancer patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appear to be at higher risk of severe outcomes, including death, but cancer type and treatment serve as better predictors, according to recent research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting I.

At the time of writing, COVID-19 has spread to more than 200 countries and territories, affecting an estimated 4.5 million people and killing over 300,000. Cancer, on the other hand, is newly diagnosed in 18 million people and takes the lives of 10 million every year.

“We have invited physician scientists who are at the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic, taking care of patients with cancer. They gathered prospective information to understand the effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer, are testing new treatments, and are making this knowledge available to the global research community, so we can all benefit from their experience,” said Professor Antoni Ribas from UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, US, chairperson of the COVID-19 and cancer plenary session of the meeting.

Christina Lau, 12 May 2020

Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a past medical history of pneumonitis are at increased risk of treatment-related pneumonitis (TAP) from immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) regimens or chemotherapy alone, an analysis of clinical trial and real-world data has shown.

Couples therapy improves sexual outcomes after radical prostatectomy

02 Mar 2019
Erectile Dysfunction: Communication is Key

Couples therapy appears to effectively improve adherence to erectile dysfunction medication after prostate cancer treatment, a new study has found.

Researchers randomly assigned 189 heterosexual couples to receive peer support, nurse counselling or usual care. In each of the couples, the men had undergone radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Primary study outcomes included sexual adjustment, masculine self-esteem and utilization of erectile aids.

Couples had been in their relationship for a mean of 32.5±11.8 years. At baseline, the mean length of time since prostate cancer diagnosis was 127.6 days. Self-reported sexual function and satisfaction postsurgery were comparable between groups. However, at the 5-year timepoint, men in the usual care group showed greater sexual self-confidence than those in the peer support group (p=0.043).

In contrast, women in the peer support and nurse counselling groups reported significantly greater function and satisfaction at 2 (p=0.002 and p=0.023, respectively) and 3 (p=0.003 and p=0.035, respectively) years after surgery.

There were also between-group differences in the utilization of erectile aids. Patients who received the nurse-conducted counselling used tablets more often than those in the usual care group at 2 (p=0.001), 3 (p=0.042), 4 (p=0.001) and 5 (p=0.032) years after surgery. Men in the peer group also used more tablets for ED than the usual care group at year 4 (p=0.005).

The psychosexual intervention also had significant benefits for masculine self-esteem, which was significantly improved at 2 (p=0.052) and 5 (p=0.045) years after surgery in the nurse counselling group.

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Most Read Articles
Natalia Reoutova, 20 May 2020

Cancer patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appear to be at higher risk of severe outcomes, including death, but cancer type and treatment serve as better predictors, according to recent research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting I.

At the time of writing, COVID-19 has spread to more than 200 countries and territories, affecting an estimated 4.5 million people and killing over 300,000. Cancer, on the other hand, is newly diagnosed in 18 million people and takes the lives of 10 million every year.

“We have invited physician scientists who are at the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic, taking care of patients with cancer. They gathered prospective information to understand the effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer, are testing new treatments, and are making this knowledge available to the global research community, so we can all benefit from their experience,” said Professor Antoni Ribas from UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, US, chairperson of the COVID-19 and cancer plenary session of the meeting.

Christina Lau, 12 May 2020

Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a past medical history of pneumonitis are at increased risk of treatment-related pneumonitis (TAP) from immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) regimens or chemotherapy alone, an analysis of clinical trial and real-world data has shown.