Most Read Articles
3 days ago
The appropriate cutoff value in predicting combined cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is 125 mm Hg for home morning systolic blood pressure (MSBP), suggests a new study.
06 Apr 2018

Female patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) have greater regression of coronary atherosclerosis than male patients despite a lower plaque burden at baseline, data from the GLAGOV trial have shown.

26 Apr 2018
Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) patients is superior to conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in terms of reducing life-threatening bleeding, new-onset atrial fibrillation and acute kidney injury, a recent meta-analysis has found.
Pearl Toh, 2 days ago
Whether the 2017 ACC/AHA* blood pressure (BP) guidelines should be adopted in Asian countries was the topic of a much-anticipated discussion here at the Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology (APSC) Congress 2018 in Taiwan last week.

Continued statin therapy after adverse reaction reduces incidence of CV events, death

04 Aug 2017
Other experts stand firm that effectiveness of statins is well proven

Continuation of statin prescriptions even after having an adverse reaction is associated with a lower incidence of mortality and cardiovascular (CV) events, a recent study has found.

Researchers recruited patients (n=28,266) with a presumed adverse reaction to a statin between 2000 and 2011 in a retrospective cohort study to explore the relationship between continued statin therapy (any prescription within 12 months after an adverse reaction) and clinical outcomes.

Information on adverse reactions to statins was obtained from structured electronic medical record data or natural-language processing of narrative provider notes. Time to a CV event (myocardial infarction or stroke) or death was the primary composite outcome.

The text of electronic provider notes provided most of the adverse reactions to statins (81 percent). Of the patients, 19,989 (70.7 percent) continued receiving statin prescriptions after the adverse reaction.

The cumulative incidence of CV events or death was 12.2 percent for patients with continued statin prescriptions vs 13.9 percent for those who stopped receiving statins (difference, 1.7 percent; 95 percent CI, 0.8 to 2.7 percent; p<0.001) 4 years after the presumed adverse event.

Secondary analysis of 7,604 patients who received a different statin after the adverse reaction revealed that 2,014 (26.5 percent) had a documented adverse reaction to the second statin. However, 1,696 (84.2 percent) of these patients continued to receive statin prescriptions.

“The risk of recurrent adverse reactions to statins could not be established for the entire sample,” researchers said, adding that it was also not possible to determine whether patients actually took the statins.

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Most Read Articles
3 days ago
The appropriate cutoff value in predicting combined cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is 125 mm Hg for home morning systolic blood pressure (MSBP), suggests a new study.
06 Apr 2018

Female patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) have greater regression of coronary atherosclerosis than male patients despite a lower plaque burden at baseline, data from the GLAGOV trial have shown.

26 Apr 2018
Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) patients is superior to conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in terms of reducing life-threatening bleeding, new-onset atrial fibrillation and acute kidney injury, a recent meta-analysis has found.
Pearl Toh, 2 days ago
Whether the 2017 ACC/AHA* blood pressure (BP) guidelines should be adopted in Asian countries was the topic of a much-anticipated discussion here at the Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology (APSC) Congress 2018 in Taiwan last week.