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Common causes of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy

31 Aug 2017
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Pregnancy-associated thrombocytopenia (PAT), hypertensive disorder in pregnancy (PIH) and idiopathic thrombocytopenia (ITP) are common causes of thrombocytopenia in pregnant women, a new observational study has shown.

The study included 195 pregnant women (mean age 28.3±4.2 years) with thrombocytopenia complications, of which 60 percent (n=117) were caused by PAT, 28.2 percent (n=55) by ITP and 11.8 percent (n=23) by PIH. Exclusion criteria included multiple gestation and irregular examinations during pregnancy.

There were significant among-group differences in terms of maternal age (p=0.012), gestational age (p=0.000), premature delivery (p=0.000), neonatal birth weight (p=0.005) and times of pregnancy (p=0.001).

Specifically, gestational age at delivery was significantly lower in PIH and ITP patients than in PAT patients (p<0.05). Premature and low birth weight infants were significantly more common in PIH patients than in PAT or ITP patients (p<0.05).

Notably, thrombocytopenia occurred significantly earlier in ITP patients than in women with either PAT or PIH (p=0.000).

Therapy was recommended for 40.5 percent (n=79) of the participating women. Corticosteroids were given to 31 women, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) to 30, and a combination of the two to 18.

Therapies were given to 23.1 percent (n=27) and 39.1 percent (n=9) of PAT and PIH patients, respectively, to increase platelet counts. Seven days after delivery, there were no significant differences in platelet counts between the treatment and nontreatment groups (p=0.309 and p=0.816, respectively).

On the other hand, 78.2 percent (n=43) of the ITP patients were administered treatments during pregnancy. Seven days after delivery, there was a significant difference in platelet counts between the treatment and nontreatment groups (p=0.049). Fifteen patients required additional therapy during the first few days after delivery.

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Most Read Articles
4 days ago
The appropriate cutoff value in predicting combined cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is 125 mm Hg for home morning systolic blood pressure (MSBP), suggests a new study.
Pearl Toh, 3 days ago
Whether the 2017 ACC/AHA* blood pressure (BP) guidelines should be adopted in Asian countries was the topic of a much-anticipated discussion here at the Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology (APSC) Congress 2018 in Taiwan last week.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 5 days ago
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