Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 07 Aug 2018
A home-based, self-applied wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) patch facilitates diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF) among high-risk individuals, according to the mSToPS* trial.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 2 days ago

A genotype-guided approach to warfarin dosing may result in fewer dose adjustments in Asian patients, according to a study from Singapore.

4 days ago

Fungal microbiome, also called the mycobiome, appears to be highly variable in patients with well-characterized fungal diseases, a recent study has shown. Moreover, severe asthmatics have the highest fungal loads, along with those receiving steroid and antifungal therapy.

Audrey Abella, 07 Aug 2018
The use of the investigational first-in-class attachment inhibitor fostemsavir led to improved baseline viral and CD4+ T-cell counts in patients with HIV-1 infection who had limited treatment options and were failing their current antiretroviral regimen, according to the subgroup analysis results of the BRIGHTE* study presented at AIDS 2018.

Coffee consumption confers health benefits

01 Dec 2017

Drinking coffee is not only safe but also seems to confer various health benefits such as risk reductions in mortality, cardiovascular disease and cancer, a recent study suggests.

The research team performed an umbrella review of 218 meta-analyses that investigated the impact of coffee consumption on any health outcome. Only interventional and observational studies were eligible; studies that focused on genetic polymorphisms for coffee metabolism were excluded.

The databases of Embase, Pubmed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and CINAHL were accessed for the current study.

Compared with no coffee consumption per day, all-cause mortality was maximally reduced with the consumption of three cups a day (relative risk [RR], 0.83; 95 percent CI, 0.83 to 0.88). Even at the highest exposure level of seven cups per day, all-cause mortality risk was reduced (RR, 0.90; 0.85 to 0.96).

In terms of cardiovascular risk, coffee drinkers had a 19-percent lower risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with nondrinkers (RR, 0.81; 0.72 to 0.90). Risks of mortality from coronary heart disease (RR, 0.84; 0.71 to 0.99) and stroke (RR, 0.70; 0.80 to 0.90) were also lower for drinkers.

Cancer incidence was also found to be reduced in individuals with high coffee consumption levels compared to nondrinkers (RR, 0.82; 0.74 to 0.89), with one extra cup per day also resulting in lower cancer incidences (RR, 0.97; 0.96 to 0.98).

While high coffee consumption was protective against many different cancers such as skin, oral, prostate and endometrial cancers, high consumption levels also increased lung cancer risk (odds ratio, 1.59; 1.26 to 2.00).

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Oncology - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 07 Aug 2018
A home-based, self-applied wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) patch facilitates diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF) among high-risk individuals, according to the mSToPS* trial.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 2 days ago

A genotype-guided approach to warfarin dosing may result in fewer dose adjustments in Asian patients, according to a study from Singapore.

4 days ago

Fungal microbiome, also called the mycobiome, appears to be highly variable in patients with well-characterized fungal diseases, a recent study has shown. Moreover, severe asthmatics have the highest fungal loads, along with those receiving steroid and antifungal therapy.

Audrey Abella, 07 Aug 2018
The use of the investigational first-in-class attachment inhibitor fostemsavir led to improved baseline viral and CD4+ T-cell counts in patients with HIV-1 infection who had limited treatment options and were failing their current antiretroviral regimen, according to the subgroup analysis results of the BRIGHTE* study presented at AIDS 2018.