Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 01 Feb 2019
More children are expected to be diagnosed with hypertension based on the new criteria for high blood pressure (HBP) in young people, according to a new study. In addition, the strength of association of HBP with body mass index (BMI) and other medical and behavioural factors has not changed, supporting the validity of the new definition.
29 Nov 2018
Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with underlying risk factors in children with congenital hyperinsulinism (HI) treated with diazoxide, reports a study. Other adverse events, however, do not show any identifiable risk profile.
18 Jan 2019
Azithromycin treatment in children with recurrent asthma-like symptoms acutely disrupts gut microbiota composition, a recent study has found.
14 Jan 2019
The application of mupirocin to multiple body sites of infants appears to be safe and effective for eradicating Staphylococcus aureus carriage in the neonatal intensive care unit setting, a study has found. However, recolonization occurs after 2–3 weeks in a number of infants who remain hospitalized.

Children with poor oral health more likely to underperform in school

07 Feb 2019
How can dentists make children feel less afraid of them?

Children with caries and tooth pain may struggle with school absenteeism and perform poorly in academics, a recent study has found.

Researchers performed a meta-analysis of 14 studies, yielding a cumulative sample of 139,989 children. Most of the studies were cross-sectional in design (n=12) and had student achievement as the primary outcome (n=6).

Nine studies, including three additional that reported both outcomes, were included in the qualitative analysis of the effect of oral health on school performance. Overall, there was enough evidence to suggest a negative correlation between oral health and academic achievement regardless of age.

This was further confirmed in a meta-analysis, where a significant and positive effect size (1.52; 95 percent CI, 1.20–1.83) indicated a greater risk of poor academic achievement. Heterogeneity among studies was not significant (p=0.125).

Eight studies were included in the qualitative analysis of oral health and school attendance. Findings were less clear: some studies reported a strong and significant association between absenteeism and poor oral health, while others did not.

However, a subsequent random-effects meta-analysis showed that having poor oral health significantly increased the risk of being absent from school (pooled odds ratio, 1.43; 1.24–1.63), with no significant heterogeneity across studies.

In the present study, researchers accessed the databases of PubMed, Embase and Google Scholar for relevant articles published from January 1945 through December 2017. The modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess quality and returned an average value of 3.93.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS JPOG - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 01 Feb 2019
More children are expected to be diagnosed with hypertension based on the new criteria for high blood pressure (HBP) in young people, according to a new study. In addition, the strength of association of HBP with body mass index (BMI) and other medical and behavioural factors has not changed, supporting the validity of the new definition.
29 Nov 2018
Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with underlying risk factors in children with congenital hyperinsulinism (HI) treated with diazoxide, reports a study. Other adverse events, however, do not show any identifiable risk profile.
18 Jan 2019
Azithromycin treatment in children with recurrent asthma-like symptoms acutely disrupts gut microbiota composition, a recent study has found.
14 Jan 2019
The application of mupirocin to multiple body sites of infants appears to be safe and effective for eradicating Staphylococcus aureus carriage in the neonatal intensive care unit setting, a study has found. However, recolonization occurs after 2–3 weeks in a number of infants who remain hospitalized.