Most Read Articles
Rachel Soon, 6 days ago

On 8 August, the first town hall held by the Ministry of Health (MOH) with members of the pharmacy profession took place in Putrajaya. Over 500 pharmacists from across the country and from different areas of practice—community and hospital, public and private, academy and industry—converged to fill the auditorium for the chance to engage in direct dialogue with MOH.

4 days ago
Pulmonary function has potential predictive value for future increases in arterial stiffness and its progression, as reported in a recent study.
3 days ago
Systolic blood pressure appears to have a strong association with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) but not with unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA), whereas current smoking and female sex are risk factors for both conditions, a study has found.
5 days ago
Poor adherence to blood pressure-lowering medications does not appear to be a cause of masked uncontrolled hypertension (MUCH), with a recent study showing that the levels of medication adherence is similar between patients with MUCH and those with true controlled hypertension.

Children with poor oral health more likely to underperform in school

07 Feb 2019
How can dentists make children feel less afraid of them?

Children with caries and tooth pain may struggle with school absenteeism and perform poorly in academics, a recent study has found.

Researchers performed a meta-analysis of 14 studies, yielding a cumulative sample of 139,989 children. Most of the studies were cross-sectional in design (n=12) and had student achievement as the primary outcome (n=6).

Nine studies, including three additional that reported both outcomes, were included in the qualitative analysis of the effect of oral health on school performance. Overall, there was enough evidence to suggest a negative correlation between oral health and academic achievement regardless of age.

This was further confirmed in a meta-analysis, where a significant and positive effect size (1.52; 95 percent CI, 1.20–1.83) indicated a greater risk of poor academic achievement. Heterogeneity among studies was not significant (p=0.125).

Eight studies were included in the qualitative analysis of oral health and school attendance. Findings were less clear: some studies reported a strong and significant association between absenteeism and poor oral health, while others did not.

However, a subsequent random-effects meta-analysis showed that having poor oral health significantly increased the risk of being absent from school (pooled odds ratio, 1.43; 1.24–1.63), with no significant heterogeneity across studies.

In the present study, researchers accessed the databases of PubMed, Embase and Google Scholar for relevant articles published from January 1945 through December 2017. The modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess quality and returned an average value of 3.93.

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Most Read Articles
Rachel Soon, 6 days ago

On 8 August, the first town hall held by the Ministry of Health (MOH) with members of the pharmacy profession took place in Putrajaya. Over 500 pharmacists from across the country and from different areas of practice—community and hospital, public and private, academy and industry—converged to fill the auditorium for the chance to engage in direct dialogue with MOH.

4 days ago
Pulmonary function has potential predictive value for future increases in arterial stiffness and its progression, as reported in a recent study.
3 days ago
Systolic blood pressure appears to have a strong association with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) but not with unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA), whereas current smoking and female sex are risk factors for both conditions, a study has found.
5 days ago
Poor adherence to blood pressure-lowering medications does not appear to be a cause of masked uncontrolled hypertension (MUCH), with a recent study showing that the levels of medication adherence is similar between patients with MUCH and those with true controlled hypertension.