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Children with low HDL-c more likely to develop inflammatory bowel disease

12 Apr 2018
Children born via caesarean-section have an increased risk in developing childhood obesity and this has been linked to the lack of exposure to a mother’s gut bacteria.

Low serum concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) during childhood is associated with subsequent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a recent study suggests.

The study included 3,551 children and adolescents whose body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, HDL-c levels, physical activity and C-reactive protein concentrations were measured at baseline in 1980. Participants were followed for subsequent IBD diagnoses, and a multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine significant risk factors for IBD.

After the final follow-up in 2011, 1.4 percent (n=49) of participants developed IBD, of whom 31 had ulcerative colitis, 12 had Crohn’s disease and six had undetermined colitis. Multivariate analysis revealed an inverse and significant relationship between childhood HDL-c and subsequent IBD diagnosis (odds ratio for each 1-standard deviation increase in HDL-c, 0.57; 95 percent CI, 0.39–0.82; p=0.006).

The results remained robust even after adjusting for levels of HDL-c in adulthood (p=0.003) and in sex-specific and outcome-specific analyses. HDL-c levels in adulthood were significantly lower in participants who developed IBD than in those who did not (1.22±0.32 vs 1.32±0.32 mmol/L; p=0.02).

Researchers then performed genotyping on the participants and found that the genetic z-scores 71 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with elevated HDL-c concentrations were significantly lower in patients with IBD (p=0.01).

Future studies are needed to identify the underlying mechanisms that account for the association between HDL-c and IBD, and potentially provide therapeutic options, said researchers. Clinically, the findings may refine IBD prediction through the consideration of HDL-c information.

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Most Read Articles
4 days ago
Higher intake levels of coffee appear to be associated with reduced risk of developing chronic kidney disease, according to data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 2 days ago
Infants delivered via caesarean section may be at increased risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, according to a US study. Altered microbiota colonization is a possible explanation for this risk, although clear biological mechanisms have yet to be established.
Yesterday
Men with high levels of exposure to diesel exhaust are at greater risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (AML), as shown in a recent study. This is not true for women.
Pearl Toh, 3 days ago
Taking marine-derived omega-3 fatty acid (FA) supplements does not appear to protect participants from coronary heart disease (CHD) and major vascular events, regardless of history of vascular disease, lipid levels, statin use, or diabetes, suggests a recent meta-analysis.