Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 5 days ago

Patients with mild hypertension who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) do not appear to derive mortality or CVD benefit from antihypertensive treatments, raising questions on the need for treatment in this population, according to a recent study from England.

Pearl Toh, 09 Nov 2018
A personalized computerized neurofeedback intervention for training attention and memory shows potential in cognitive training for healthy elderly men, who improved in cognitive performance after the training, although no significant improvements were seen in the overall study population.
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The pneumonia-causing bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), can be spread through nose picking and rubbing after exposure of the hands to the bacteria — in addition to the conventionally known route of inhalation of airborne droplets, a study reveals.

Cancer progression common in men who undergo deferred prostatectomy

11 Sep 2018
Prostate cancer is a silent killer. Many may not be aware of the illness until it is too late.

Despite active surveillance, cancer progression appears to be common in men who undergo deferred radical prostatectomy (RP), according to a recent study.

The study included 132 men with screening-detected prostate cancer (median age 64 years) who received radical prostatectomy following active surveillance. Radical prostatectomy was performed upon detection of disease progression or patient request. Active surveillance included prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests every 3–6 months and biopsies every 2–4 years.

The median time from prostate cancer diagnosis to RP was 1.9 years, during which the participants received a median of one repeat biopsy for active surveillance.

At deferred RP, 52 patients (39 percent) showed at least one unfavourable pathology in the RP specimen. For instance, 35 percent (n=46) of the participants demonstrated an increase in Gleason score (GS) from diagnostic biopsy. Twelve men (9.1 percent) had GS >3+4.

Moreover, 22 percent (n=29) were positive for extraprostatic extensions, 3.0 percent (n=4) had seminal vesicle invasion, 22 percent (n=29) demonstrated positive surgical margins, and 0.8 percent (n=1) had positive lymph nodes. The median tumour volume was 0.70 mL.

PSA relapse was reported in 25 men, 10 of whom underwent salvage radiation. The resulting 10-year PSA relapse-free survival was 79.5 percent.

At the time of diagnostic biopsy, 29 percent (n=38) of the patients had unidentifiable index tumours. At the last repeat biopsy before the deferred surgery, index tumour was not identified in 22 participants (21 percent).

Clinicians can use the findings in counselling prostate cancer patients who choose to undergo active surveillance and deferred RP, researchers said, adding that there is a need to improve the detection of cancer progression during active surveillance.

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 5 days ago

Patients with mild hypertension who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) do not appear to derive mortality or CVD benefit from antihypertensive treatments, raising questions on the need for treatment in this population, according to a recent study from England.

Pearl Toh, 09 Nov 2018
A personalized computerized neurofeedback intervention for training attention and memory shows potential in cognitive training for healthy elderly men, who improved in cognitive performance after the training, although no significant improvements were seen in the overall study population.
3 days ago
Type 1 diabetes impairs cognitive functioning in children, and this effect is exacerbated by extreme glycaemic levels, according to a recent meta-analysis.
Pearl Toh, 08 Nov 2018
The pneumonia-causing bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), can be spread through nose picking and rubbing after exposure of the hands to the bacteria — in addition to the conventionally known route of inhalation of airborne droplets, a study reveals.