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Burn patients do not suffer from heightened anxiety, depression

08 Aug 2019
Sunburn rashes could develop into blisters

Anxiety and depression symptoms are not especially elevated among people who have sustained burns, a recent study has shown.

The study included 164 burn patients (mean age, 45.5±15.5 years; 77 percent male), in whom psychological burden was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, while the Short Form-36 questionnaire was used to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Only those with >10 percent total body surface area were eligible for inclusion.

A reference group of 6,093 controls (mean age, 46±15.1 years; 46 percent male) was also included.

Burn patients garnered mean anxiety scores of 5.7±4.6 and 5.8±4.6 after 12 and 24 months, respectively. These were not significantly different from reference scores over the same time span (p=0.12 at 12 months; p=0.06 at 24 months).

In comparison, depression scores in burn patients at 12 and 24 months were 4.6±4.0 and 4.7±4.4, respectively. Twelve-month scores were comparable with controls (p=0.12), but depression was significantly different between groups at 24 months (p=0.031).

Linear regression analysis identified the presence of pre-existing conditions as a significant predictor of anxiety (β, –1.46, 95 percent CI, –2.86 to –0.06; p=0.042) and depression (β, –1.96, –3.18 to –0.74; p=0.002). The same was true for the lack of employment in the past 12 months (anxiety: β, 1.15, 0.49–1.81; p=0.001; depression: β, 0.68, 0.09–1.27; p=0.023).

The present findings identified no particular elevations in mental health problems among burn patients, said researchers. “Some patients, however, express these symptoms, and at the same time report a poorer HRQoL, although it is more likely that anxiety, depression and poor quality of life comes from the fact that burned patients tended to have more coexisting conditions beforehand.”

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 11 Sep 2019

Beta-blockers could reduce mortality risk in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and moderate or moderately-severe renal dysfunction without causing harm, according to the BB-META-HF* trial presented at ESC 2019.

Elvira Manzano, Yesterday

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), in an update of its 2013 recommendations, called on clinicians to offer risk-reducing medications to women who are at increased risk for breast cancer but at low risk for adverse effects.

Pearl Toh, 2 days ago
The use of SGLT-2* inhibitors was not associated with a higher risk of severe or nonsevere urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with DPP**-4 inhibitors or GLP-1*** receptor agonists, a population-based cohort study shows.
5 days ago
In type 2 diabetes patients taking sulfonylureas, hypoglycaemia duration is longer at night and is inversely correlated with the level of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), a new study reports.