Most Read Articles
4 days ago
Ivermectin confers benefits in the treatment of COVID-19, with a recent study showing that its use helps reduce the risk of death especially in patients with severe pulmonary involvement.
3 days ago
Mental health comorbidities are common among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and may lead to worse outcomes, a recent study has found.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 13 Nov 2020

Diabetes is a key risk factor for heart failure (HF), which is the leading cause of hospitalization in patients with or without diabetes. SGLT-2* inhibitors (SGLT-2is) have been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization for HF (HHF) regardless of the presence or absence of diabetes.

Tristan Manalac, 18 Nov 2020
The substitution of isoleucine to leucine at amino acid 97 (I97L) in the core region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) seems to reduce its potency, decreasing the efficiency of both infection and the synthesis of the virus’ covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA, reports a new study presented at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2020).

Body mass index matters little in success of intrauterine insemination

3 days ago

Women who are overweight or obese do not necessarily have lower chances of a successful birth following infertility treatments, including intrauterine insemination, relative to women with normal weight, a study has found.

The analysis was based on 3,217 IUI treatment cycles in 1,306 patients (mean age, 32 years; mean body mass index [BMI], 27.5 kg/m2). Forty-seven percent of the cycles were in normal weight women, 24.1 percent in overweight women, and 28.3 percent in obese women (mean BMI, 37.3 kg/m2). The total motile sperm in the inseminate was similar across the BMI groups.

Most treatments were indicated for unexplained infertility (30 percent), while others were for male factor infertility (19 percent) or anovulation (16 percent). Anovulation was common in the obese group (25 percent). Oral ovulation induction was used in the majority of cycles (61 percent), unmedicated IUI in 14 percent, and injectable ovulation induction in 23 percent.

Live birth rates were similar between normal weight and obese women (10 percent vs 11 percent; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.02, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.76–1.37). When analysing BMI as a continuous variable, each unit increase in BMI had a null effect on birth success (aOR, 1.00, 95 percent CI, 0.984–1.019; p=0.906). There also was no difference in rates of clinical pregnancy, multiple gestation, or multiple delivery.

However, a BMI ≥30 kg/m2 was associated with a higher likelihood of biochemical pregnancy compared with a BMI in the normal range (aOR, 2.37, 95 percent CI, 1.33–4.25). Neither miscarriage nor an ectopic pregnancy was more likely to occur in the obese group.

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Most Read Articles
4 days ago
Ivermectin confers benefits in the treatment of COVID-19, with a recent study showing that its use helps reduce the risk of death especially in patients with severe pulmonary involvement.
3 days ago
Mental health comorbidities are common among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and may lead to worse outcomes, a recent study has found.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 13 Nov 2020

Diabetes is a key risk factor for heart failure (HF), which is the leading cause of hospitalization in patients with or without diabetes. SGLT-2* inhibitors (SGLT-2is) have been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization for HF (HHF) regardless of the presence or absence of diabetes.

Tristan Manalac, 18 Nov 2020
The substitution of isoleucine to leucine at amino acid 97 (I97L) in the core region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) seems to reduce its potency, decreasing the efficiency of both infection and the synthesis of the virus’ covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA, reports a new study presented at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2020).