Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 29 May 2020

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

4 days ago
Use of corticosteroid is not associated with improved outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients admitted to the hospital with acute exacerbation (AE), reveals a recent study. In addition, corticosteroids may even contribute to reduced overall survival following exacerbation.
Dr. Wong Soon Tee, 28 May 2020
Acne is a common skin problem seen in primary care. Dr Wong Soon Tee of Assurance Skin Clinic at Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Singapore shares his insights with Pearl Toh on how to manage acne in the primary care setting.
27 May 2020
The perception that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) cause multiple serious adverse effects (AEs) is supported by many internists, who then recommend treatment cessation even in patients at high risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), reveals a study.

Benzodiazepines, Z-drugs do not up risk of dementia in patients with affective disorders

05 May 2020

Use of benzodiazepines or Z-drugs is not associated with subsequent dementia, even when exposures are cumulated or divided into long- and short-acting drugs, reveals a study.

Of the 235,465 patients included, 171,287 (75.9 percent) had any use of benzodiazepines or Z-drugs, and 9,776 (4.2 percent) were diagnosed with dementia during a median follow-up of 6.1 years (interquartile range, 2.7–11).

After multiple adjustments in either the cohort analysis or a nested case-control design, no association was found between any use of benzodiazepines or Z-drugs and subsequent dementia. The cohort analysis further showed that the number of prescriptions and the cumulated dose of benzodiazepines or Z-drugs did not correlate with dementia.

On the other hand, patients with the lowest use of benzodiazepines or Z-drugs had a slightly higher risk of developing dementia (odds ratio [OR], 1.08, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.01–1.15) compared with no lifetime use in the nested case-control study, where prescriptions were counted from 1995 until 2 years before the index date.

In contrast, those with the highest use had the lowest odds of developing dementia (OR, 0.83, 95 percent CI, 0.77–0.88).

“Some results were compatible with a protective effect,” the investigators said.

This cohort and nested case-control study involved patients aged >20 years who were identified in the Danish National Patient Registry as having had a first-time hospital contract for an affective disorder between 1996 and 2015.

The investigators obtained information on all prescriptions for benzodiazepines, Z-drugs and other anxiolytics from the Danish National Prescription Registry and followed patients for incident dementia, defined by hospital discharge diagnosis or acetylcholinesterase inhibitor use.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Doctor - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 29 May 2020

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

4 days ago
Use of corticosteroid is not associated with improved outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients admitted to the hospital with acute exacerbation (AE), reveals a recent study. In addition, corticosteroids may even contribute to reduced overall survival following exacerbation.
Dr. Wong Soon Tee, 28 May 2020
Acne is a common skin problem seen in primary care. Dr Wong Soon Tee of Assurance Skin Clinic at Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Singapore shares his insights with Pearl Toh on how to manage acne in the primary care setting.
27 May 2020
The perception that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) cause multiple serious adverse effects (AEs) is supported by many internists, who then recommend treatment cessation even in patients at high risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), reveals a study.