Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 4 days ago

Children who are fully vaccinated against the flu, ie, receive the recommended number of influenza vaccine doses, have a lower risk of acquiring influenza compared with those who are partially vaccinated, a US study found.

06 Jul 2020
Routinely used for treating cardiovascular diseases, statins have been shown to benefit other conditions, and new evidence suggests that using the drug at high intensity reduces the risk of hip or knee replacement, an effect that may be specific to rheumatoid arthritis.
Pearl Toh, 29 Jun 2020
Having migraine during midlife appears to be associated with a higher risk of developing dementia in later life, according to a large population-based longitudinal Danish study presented at the AHS* 2020 Virtual Meeting, indicating that migraine may be a risk factor for dementia.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 5 days ago

Upadacitinib may be a suitable treatment for patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who have insufficient response to non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (non-bDMARDs), according to results of the phase III SELECT-PsA-1* trial presented at EULAR 2020.

Baseline IOP affects selective laser trabeculoplasty success

23 Jun 2020
The future of eyesight restoration may come from a most unlikely corneal donor – pigs.

High baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) may influence treatment outcomes after selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT), a recent study has found.

The study included 252 eyes from 198 adult patients (mean age, 69.6±11.2 years; 49.2 percent female) with open-angle glaucoma. SLT success was defined as a 20-percent decline in IOP reduction or a drop of at least one medication. The principal outcome was the identification of predictors of success.

Mean IOP at baseline was 17.8±4.4 mm Hg. Patients were taking an average of 2.0±1.3 glaucoma medications before surgery. Two months after surgery, 33.6 percent of the procedures were deemed to be successful. This climbed slightly to 38.5 percent by 6 months. IOP dropped to 16.7±4.3 and 15.2±4.9 mm Hg at the respective time points (p<0.001 for both).

Changes in the average number of medications changed to 1.6±1.3 at 2 months and 2.0±1.3 at 6 months, though none were significant (p=0.709 and p=0.578, respectively).

IOP was the only baseline factor that was significantly affective of SLT success. Those with baseline IOP >18 mm Hg saw a 17.3-percent (3.7±4.2 mm Hg) drop in IOP at month 2, as opposed to a 4.9-percent (–0.7±5.6 mm Hg) increase in those with baseline IOP 18 mm Hg.

This pattern persisted until 6 months. Participants with high baseline IOP saw a mean 2-month drop of 23.7 percent, as opposed to a 4.9-percent increase reported in those with low IOP at baseline (p<0.001). Baseline IOP was not related to changes in the mean number of medications.

Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 4 days ago

Children who are fully vaccinated against the flu, ie, receive the recommended number of influenza vaccine doses, have a lower risk of acquiring influenza compared with those who are partially vaccinated, a US study found.

06 Jul 2020
Routinely used for treating cardiovascular diseases, statins have been shown to benefit other conditions, and new evidence suggests that using the drug at high intensity reduces the risk of hip or knee replacement, an effect that may be specific to rheumatoid arthritis.
Pearl Toh, 29 Jun 2020
Having migraine during midlife appears to be associated with a higher risk of developing dementia in later life, according to a large population-based longitudinal Danish study presented at the AHS* 2020 Virtual Meeting, indicating that migraine may be a risk factor for dementia.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 5 days ago

Upadacitinib may be a suitable treatment for patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who have insufficient response to non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (non-bDMARDs), according to results of the phase III SELECT-PsA-1* trial presented at EULAR 2020.