Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 29 May 2020

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

05 Nov 2019
Low total cholesterol levels appear to carry increased major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) hazard in older men without ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and not receiving statin therapy but not to those on statins, according to data from the CHAMP (Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project) cohort.
Elvira Manzano, 13 Apr 2020
A gout drug that’s been around for years reduced the risk of ischaemic cardiovascular (CV) events when given at a low dose in patients who had myocardial infarction (MI) and was cost-effective, an analysis of the COLCOT* trial has shown.
27 May 2020
Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels appear to be an independent predictor of coronary artery disease in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, a new study has found.

Aprocitentan lowers blood pressure without serious adverse effects

06 Mar 2020

The dual endothelin receptor antagonist aprocitentan reduces blood pressure (BP) at doses of 10 to 25 mg without producing serious adverse effects, according to the results of a dose-response study.

The study randomized 490 patients with a sitting diastolic BP of 90–109 mm Hg to receive aprocitentan at 5, 10, 25 or 50 mg, placebo, or lisinopril 20 mg as a positive control. Treatment was given once daily for 8 weeks. Multiple automated office BP readings were taken as patients rested unattended (unattended automated office BP).

A total of 409 patients completed 8 weeks of therapy. Aprocitentan at higher doses yielded reductions in unattended automated office BP. Specifically, the 10-, 25- and 50-mg doses lowered sitting systolic/diastolic unattended automated office BP by 7.05/4.93, 9.90/6.99 and 7.58/4.95 mm Hg, respectively, compared with placebo (p≤0.014). On the other hand, lisinopril 20 mg produced a reduction of 4.84/3.81 mm Hg relative to placebo.

In the group of patients with valid ambulatory BP, the placebo-corrected 24-hour BP reductions were 3.99/4.04 mm Hg with aprocitentan 10 mg, 4.83/5.89 mm Hg with the 25-mg dose, and 3.67/4.45 mm Hg with the 50-mg dose.

Incidence of adverse events did not differ in the aprocitentan groups (22.0–40.2 percent) and the placebo group (36.6 percent). Relative to placebo, aprocitentan was associated with dose-dependent decreases in haemoglobin, haematocrit, albumin and uric acid, as well as an increase in estimated plasma volume, but no change in weight.

According to the researchers, aprocitentan doses of 12.5 and 25 mg were selected for further investigation in hypertension.

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 29 May 2020

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

05 Nov 2019
Low total cholesterol levels appear to carry increased major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) hazard in older men without ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and not receiving statin therapy but not to those on statins, according to data from the CHAMP (Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project) cohort.
Elvira Manzano, 13 Apr 2020
A gout drug that’s been around for years reduced the risk of ischaemic cardiovascular (CV) events when given at a low dose in patients who had myocardial infarction (MI) and was cost-effective, an analysis of the COLCOT* trial has shown.
27 May 2020
Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels appear to be an independent predictor of coronary artery disease in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, a new study has found.