Most Read Articles
22 Jul 2020
Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), in general, are caused by viral pathogens and do not require antibiotics; however, several cases have ended up with inappropriate antibiotic prescription. This may lead to the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), which in turn can result in increased risk of the spread of infection, increased cost of treatment and even increased number of fatalities due to antibiotic-resistant infections.

Professor Roman Kozlov, the rector of Smolensk State Medical University and Chief Specialist of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation on Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobial Resistance, discusses in this webcast the global problem of antibiotic overprescription in URTI and its implications to health. He also discusses the correct approach to URTI management.

Antimicrobial Resistance and Respiratory Infections

22 Jul 2020
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a serious health-threatening problem projected to cause up to 10 million deaths by 2050 if not addressed accordingly. Its common cause is the unnecessary use of antibiotics, which usually happens for respiratory tract infections, including sore throat.

 Dr Martin Duerden, a Fellow of the UK Royal College of General Practitioners, Medical Adviser of the Centre for Medical Education of the Cardiff University, and Expert Adviser of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Center for Clinical Practice, discusses in this webcast the problem of AMR and the importance of effective communication between the healthcare provider (HCP) and the patient. He also explains the Global Respiratory Infection Partnership (GRIP) Initiative, which educates and supports HCPs in helping their patients better understand the importance of proper antibiotic use.
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Most Read Articles
22 Jul 2020
Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), in general, are caused by viral pathogens and do not require antibiotics; however, several cases have ended up with inappropriate antibiotic prescription. This may lead to the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), which in turn can result in increased risk of the spread of infection, increased cost of treatment and even increased number of fatalities due to antibiotic-resistant infections.

Professor Roman Kozlov, the rector of Smolensk State Medical University and Chief Specialist of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation on Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobial Resistance, discusses in this webcast the global problem of antibiotic overprescription in URTI and its implications to health. He also discusses the correct approach to URTI management.