Most Read Articles
31 Oct 2017
In patients with underlying heart failure (HF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), concurrent episodes of community-acquired pneumonia increase the risk of disease exacerbations, such as short-term cardiac complications and respiratory failure, a recent study has shown.
16 Mar 2017
Probiotics have a long history of use in humans. Defined as "live organisms that confer a health benefit on the host when administered in adequate amounts", the spectrum of use of probiotics in humans ranges from foods and dietary supplements to pharmaceutical/nutraceutical products to affect general health and disease. While the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are the two most common probiotics associated with consumer products, there exist other organisms (eg, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, some non-pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli and Bacillus species) that are used as probiotics.1–3 One of them is the probiotic strain B. clausii that has been found to be effective for the treatment of diarrhoea and antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal side effects.4–6
02 Nov 2017
Passive immunization with neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) do not appear to prevent transmission of HIV-1 to the infant from the infected mother’s breastmilk, a recent study suggests.
Stephen Padilla, 06 Dec 2016
Dengvaxia, a recombinant, live-attenuated dengue vaccine, has the potential to bring down the number of hospitalizations by 13 to 25 percent and be cost-effective in areas of moderate-to-high dengue endemicity, according to a model comparison study.

Antibiotics eradicate S. aureus colonization, prevent SSTI recurrence in children

13 Oct 2017

Use of systemic antibiotics, in conjunction with performance of incision and drainage, in the management of paediatric acute skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) appears to reduce Staphylococcus aureus colonization and the likelihood of infection recurrence, a prospective study has found.

Researchers looked at a cohort of 383 children (median age 3 years; 56 percent female) with S. aureus SSTI for which an incision and drainage procedure was performed. Swab samples from the children revealed S. aureus colonization in the anterior nares, axillae or inguinal folds.

Guideline-recommended antibiotics were empirically prescribed to 355 (93 percent) patients, with 81 receiving more than one antibiotic class. Most received clindamycin (n=220) or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (n=199), while the others were given vancomycin (n=19) beta-lactams (n=12). The remaining patients in the cohort were not prescribed systemic antibiotics.

Repeat colonization sampling was performed within 3 months (median 38 days) in 357 patients, and incidence of recurrent infection was ascertained for up to 1 year.

Results showed that children prescribed guideline-recommended empiric antibiotics had reduced likelihood of remaining colonized at follow-up sampling (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.49; 95 percent CI, 0.30 to 0.79) and of having recurrent SSTI (aHR, 0.57; 0.34, 0.94) compared with those who did not receive antibiotics for their SSTI.

Of note, remaining colonized at repeat sampling was associated with a more than twofold risk of infection recurrence over 12 months (aHR, 2.37, 95% CI 1.69, 3.31).

Clindamycin was particularly superior to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in eradicating S. aureus colonization (44 vs 57 percent remained colonized; p=0.03) and preventing recurrent SSTI (31 vs 47 percent had recurrence; p=0.008).

The current findings establish the benefit of systemic antibiotics beyond the resolution of acute SSTI, researchers claimed, adding that they should inform continuing conversations about optimal clinical management of SSTI in the contemporary era.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Infectious Diseases - Malaysia digital copy today!
DOWNLOAD
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
31 Oct 2017
In patients with underlying heart failure (HF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), concurrent episodes of community-acquired pneumonia increase the risk of disease exacerbations, such as short-term cardiac complications and respiratory failure, a recent study has shown.
16 Mar 2017
Probiotics have a long history of use in humans. Defined as "live organisms that confer a health benefit on the host when administered in adequate amounts", the spectrum of use of probiotics in humans ranges from foods and dietary supplements to pharmaceutical/nutraceutical products to affect general health and disease. While the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are the two most common probiotics associated with consumer products, there exist other organisms (eg, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, some non-pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli and Bacillus species) that are used as probiotics.1–3 One of them is the probiotic strain B. clausii that has been found to be effective for the treatment of diarrhoea and antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal side effects.4–6
02 Nov 2017
Passive immunization with neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) do not appear to prevent transmission of HIV-1 to the infant from the infected mother’s breastmilk, a recent study suggests.
Stephen Padilla, 06 Dec 2016
Dengvaxia, a recombinant, live-attenuated dengue vaccine, has the potential to bring down the number of hospitalizations by 13 to 25 percent and be cost-effective in areas of moderate-to-high dengue endemicity, according to a model comparison study.