Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 25 Jul 2019
Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) appear to confer more clinical benefits to elderly patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) than vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants (VKAs), suggests a study, adding that this is primarily driven by the lower rates of major bleeding.
22 Aug 2018
In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) naïve to oral anticoagulants (OACs), standard-dose nonvitamin K antagonist OACs (NOACs) provides better survival benefits than warfarin, a recent meta-analysis has shown.
Stephen Padilla, 31 Aug 2018
Treatment with rivaroxaban results in less recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in frail patients with VTE, with similar good bleeding outcomes, compared with warfarin, reports a study.
Stephen Padilla, 11 Sep 2018
Use of diclofenac, a traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) selectivity similar to COX-2 inhibitors, is associated with higher cardiovascular health risk compared with nonuse, paracetamol use and use of other traditional NSAIDs, a recent study has shown.

Antibiotic prophylaxis helps prevent recurrent UTI-related new renal scarring

05 Aug 2019
The increasing shortage of a commonly used antibiotic, Tazocin, has raised concerns on an international scale.

Antibiotic prophylaxis can reduce the risk of new renal scarring associated with recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), results of the RIVUR* trial have shown.

The authors included 489 patients (mean age, 20.3 months; 91 percent female). Those with recurrent UTI were more likely to have any new renal scarring (odds ratio [OR], 4.1, 95 percent CI, 2.0–8.5; p<0.01) after adjusting for age, sex, index UTI, duplication, bowel bladder dysfunction and antibiotic prophylaxis.

Fewer patients on antibiotic prophylaxis (n=5/244; 2 percent) than on placebo (n=13/245; 5 percent) experienced recurrent UTI-related new renal scarring.

Children on placebo had a higher risk of recurrent UTI-related new renal scarring (OR, 3.1, 1.0–8.8; p=0.04) compared with those on antibiotic prophylaxis after further adjustments for hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux grade and baseline renal scarring.

No between-group differences were observed in scar severity at final dimercaptosuccinic acid scan (p=0.88) or change from baseline (p=0.53).

“It remains unclear why new renal scarring developed in a proportion of [patients] without recurrent urinary tract infection,” the authors said. “The results should be carefully interpreted due to the inherent limitations.”

This study included children with dimercaptosuccinic acid scan within 6 months of enrolment and at least 1 follow-up dimercaptosuccinic acid scan from the RIVUR trial. Recurrent UTI-related new renal scarring, defined as recurrent UTI and new changes on dimercaptosuccinic acid scan, was the primary outcome. Propensity score was used to adjust for confounders due to a low number of events. The associations between covariates and outcome was assessed using multivariate logistic regression.

*Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux

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Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 25 Jul 2019
Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) appear to confer more clinical benefits to elderly patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) than vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants (VKAs), suggests a study, adding that this is primarily driven by the lower rates of major bleeding.
22 Aug 2018
In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) naïve to oral anticoagulants (OACs), standard-dose nonvitamin K antagonist OACs (NOACs) provides better survival benefits than warfarin, a recent meta-analysis has shown.
Stephen Padilla, 31 Aug 2018
Treatment with rivaroxaban results in less recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in frail patients with VTE, with similar good bleeding outcomes, compared with warfarin, reports a study.
Stephen Padilla, 11 Sep 2018
Use of diclofenac, a traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) selectivity similar to COX-2 inhibitors, is associated with higher cardiovascular health risk compared with nonuse, paracetamol use and use of other traditional NSAIDs, a recent study has shown.