Most Read Articles
Natalia Reoutova, 07 Jan 2020

A prospective cohort study of mothers taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and their breastfed infants has found substantially lower AED concentrations in infant vs maternal blood, with nearly half of all obtained AED concentrations in nursing infants being less than the lower limit of quantification (LLoQ).

Natalia Reoutova, 07 Jan 2020

A large prospective Chinese cohort study has found long sleep duration (≥9 hours/night) and long mid-day napping (>90 minutes) to be significantly associated with a higher risk of ischaemic stroke.

13 Aug 2017
Patients with Down syndrome (DS) have lower blood concentrations of zinc, selenium and calcium, and higher blood cell levels of copper and zinc, according to a systematic review.

Anaesthesia use accelerates cognitive decline in older adults

23 Oct 2019

Regional (RA) and general (GA) anaesthesia for surgeries result in comparable rates of global cognition decline, a recent study has found. However, RA does not seem to affect memory.

The study included 1,819 older adults (mean age, 78.9±5.1 years; 52 percent male) in whom cognitive function was longitudinally evaluated using combinations of self-reports, apolipoprotein E genotyping and different batteries. Researchers identified all procedures with RA or GA by accessing the Rochester Epidemiology Project’s medical record linkage system.

Most participants were GA-naïve (n=1,171), while 537 received a total of 915 GA administrations. On the other hand, 111 patients were exposed to 137 RA shots. Majority (86 percent) were cognitively normal at enrolment, while 14 percent (n=255) had mild cognitive impairment.

Exposure to any type of anaesthesia accelerated the decline of global cognitive function as opposed to the GA-naïve participants (RA: slope difference, –0.041, 95 percent CI, –0.071 to –0.01; p=0.011; GA: slope difference, –0.061, –0.078 to –0.044; p<0.001). The difference between the two types of anaesthesia was not significant (slope difference, –0.02, –0.053 to 0.014; p=0.25).

Analysis according to cognitive domains showed that the effect of RA (slope difference, –0.036, –0.071 to –0.001; p=0.045) was explained mostly by the faster rate of decline in attention/executive function relative to naïve counterparts. GA also exerted a significant effect on this domain (slope difference, –0.052, –0.072 to –0.033; p<0.001).

Notably, GA also resulted in a significantly greater acceleration of decline in the memory domain as opposed to controls (slope difference, –0.065, –0.084 to –0.045; p<0.001). RA had no such effect. The rates of decline after GA and RA exposure only differed for the domain of memory (difference, –0.053, –0.094 to –0.012; p=0.011), and not for any of the other domains.

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Most Read Articles
Natalia Reoutova, 07 Jan 2020

A prospective cohort study of mothers taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and their breastfed infants has found substantially lower AED concentrations in infant vs maternal blood, with nearly half of all obtained AED concentrations in nursing infants being less than the lower limit of quantification (LLoQ).

Natalia Reoutova, 07 Jan 2020

A large prospective Chinese cohort study has found long sleep duration (≥9 hours/night) and long mid-day napping (>90 minutes) to be significantly associated with a higher risk of ischaemic stroke.

13 Aug 2017
Patients with Down syndrome (DS) have lower blood concentrations of zinc, selenium and calcium, and higher blood cell levels of copper and zinc, according to a systematic review.