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Amiselimod shows promise as treatment for multiple sclerosis

02 Sep 2016
Results of a study show that patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis may benefit from the new sphingosine 1-phosphate 1 inhibitor drug amiselimod.

The multi-centre phase II MOMENTUM (Safety and Efficacy of Amiselimod in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis) trial evaluated amiselimod’s safety and effectiveness as an oral therapy for multiple sclerosis. A total of 536 patients aged 18-60 years were screened and randomized to receive placebo (n=103) or treatment with once-daily amiselimod 0.1 mg (n=105), 0.2 mg (n=103), or 0.4 mg (n=104) for 24 weeks. The improvement was monitored every month based on the incidence of gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted lesions on brain MRI.

Results revealed that between weeks 8-24, there was no significant difference observed between the median total number of gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted lesions in the aminselimod 0.1 mg and placebo. However, there were less lesions in the group that received amiselimod 0.2 mg and 0.4 mg compared to placebo.

Compared to placebo, the estimated incident rate ratio decreased dose-dependently with amiselimod.

Treatment groups for amiselimod had similar treatment-emergent adverse events. The most frequent reactions reported were headache and nasopharyngitis. None of the groups had more than one reported treatment-emergent adverse event. Significant heart rate reduction was not seen in any of the amiselimod groups.

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease with partial response to immunomodulating treatments. The present findings suggest the efficacy and safety of amiselimod as a new treatment option for multiple sclerosis.
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Most Read Articles
5 days ago
Cardiac biomarkers are useful for identifying community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients with an elevated risk of early and long-term cardiovascular (CV) events, according to a study.
3 days ago
Tofogliflozin is safe and effective for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), regardless of insulin and oral antidiabetic drugs, reports a new Japan study.
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