Most Read Articles
02 Jul 2018
The use of beta-blockers in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), especially in those without histories of myocardial infarction, appears to increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular events, according to a recent study.
Stephen Padilla, 09 Jul 2018
Compared with warfarin, apixaban appears to be the safest drug among direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), with decreased risks of major, intracranial and gastrointestinal bleeding, suggests a study. However, low-dose apixaban and rivaroxaban are associated with increased risks of all-cause mortality compared with warfarin.
24 Jun 2018
Sleep problems and depressive symptoms, and a combination of both, are differentially associated with the future incidence of physical illness, according to a study.
05 Jul 2018
Different measures of fitness and physical activity appear to be inversely associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular disease in the general population, as well as in individuals with elevated genetic risk for these diseases, according to a study.

Age alters relation between cognitive function, intraindividual variability in BP

13 Jan 2018

Intraindividual measurement-to-measurement variation in blood pressure (BP IIV) significantly predicts cognition with advancing age, a study has found.

There was a significant age by BP IIV interaction, according to the investigators.

Among individuals aged >60 years, IIV in systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) had an inverse association with Global Composite, Scanning and Tracking and the Similarities test. In addition, IIV in SBP correlated with Verbal Memory and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Furthermore, IIV in DBP was associated with the Visual-Spatial Memory and Organization composite.

No significant associations were observed between BP IIV and cognitive function in individuals aged <60 years.

In one study, researchers found that higher overall variability in both SBP and DBP was associated with poorer cognitive performance in unsuccessfully treated hypertensive individuals (with BP ≥140/90 mm Hg). However, these associations were not evident in those with controlled hypertension. [Hypertension 2014;64:1094-1101]

The present study aimed to assess age by BP IIV (SBP and DBP) interactions vis-à-vis cognitive functioning while considering medication class and polypharmacy, which might also affect BP IIV with advancing age.

A total of 980 community-dwelling individuals from the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study were included in the cross-sectional analyses. Automated BP measures were taken 15 times (five times each in sitting, reclining and standing positions). A thorough neuropsychological test battery was used after the BP assessment to examine cognitive function.

“There is evidence to suggest that BP IIV may be superior to mean BP for predicting cognitive function, taken from both within a single visit and between-visits,” the investigators noted. “BP IIV increases with age in studies of persons middle-aged and older.”

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Most Read Articles
02 Jul 2018
The use of beta-blockers in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), especially in those without histories of myocardial infarction, appears to increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular events, according to a recent study.
Stephen Padilla, 09 Jul 2018
Compared with warfarin, apixaban appears to be the safest drug among direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), with decreased risks of major, intracranial and gastrointestinal bleeding, suggests a study. However, low-dose apixaban and rivaroxaban are associated with increased risks of all-cause mortality compared with warfarin.
24 Jun 2018
Sleep problems and depressive symptoms, and a combination of both, are differentially associated with the future incidence of physical illness, according to a study.
05 Jul 2018
Different measures of fitness and physical activity appear to be inversely associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular disease in the general population, as well as in individuals with elevated genetic risk for these diseases, according to a study.