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Advanced AMD patients report reduced intake of micronutrients

05 Aug 2017
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There are significant differences in intakes of vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, folate, and vegetables between patients with late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and healthy controls, according to a recent study, which provides a better understanding of the nutritional intake of patients presenting with advanced AMD.

Compared with controls, patients with late-stage AMD had significantly lower intakes of vitamin E (9.8 vs 7.4 mg/day; p<0.0001), beta-carotene (7,738 vs 6,232 μg/day; p<0.0001), vitamin C (184 vs 161 mg/day; p=0.0002) and folate (602 vs 498.3 μg/day; p<0.0001) but had higher intakes of zinc (11.9 vs 13.0 mg/day; p<0.0001) after multivariable adjustment.

A significantly lower proportion of patients with late-stage AMD met the recommended intake of vegetables than controls (52.9 vs 64.5 percent; p=0.0002).

In this cross-sectional analysis, researchers evaluated dietary behaviours by comparing adjusted mean intakes of micronutrients and major food groups (fruits, vegetables, fish) among patients with late-stage AMD (n=480) and a sample of age‒sex-matched controls with no AMD signs (n=518).

AMD cases (aged >60 years) included those presenting for treatment to a hospital eye clinic in Sydney, Australia, from 2012 to 2015. The healthy controls were obtained from the Blue Mountains Eye Study from 2002 to 2009.

Researchers assessed dietary intake using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire and evaluated AMD lesions from retinal photographs.

“Knowledge of the risk factor profile of patients presenting with late-stage AMD could help identify the most frequent modifiable AMD precursors among people who are referred for treatment,” according to researchers.

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