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Jairia Dela Cruz, 01 Jan 2020
A novel low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) holds therapeutic potential in patients with mild-to-moderate erectile dysfunction (ED), restoring erectile function without deleterious consequences—a benefit attributed to the mechanical force of the device that can reverse the pathological changes in the corpus cavernosum, as shown in a recent study.

Adjuvant radiotherapy improves biochemical recurrence-free survival after radical prostatectomy

26 Oct 2019
Prostate cancer is a silent killer. Many may not be aware of the illness until it is too late.

Undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy improves biochemical recurrence-free survival while being reasonably tolerable, a recent study has found.

Researchers randomly assigned 250 prostate cancer patients with positive margins or extracapsular extension to receive either adjuvant radiotherapy (n=126; median age, 61 years) or not (n=124; median age, 62 years). Biochemical recurrence-free survival was the primary outcome.

The 10-year overall survival rate was 92 percent in the adjuvant radiotherapy group and 87 percent in controls. The resulting difference in risk was not statistically significant (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69, 95 percent CI, 0.29–1.60; p=0.4). Only one patient in each group died of prostate cancer, such that the malignancy-specific survival in either group was 99 percent.

Similarly, the 10-year metastasis-free survival rates between groups were statistically comparable (98 percent vs 96 percent; HR, 0.49, 0.09–2.68; p=0.4).

Adjuvant radiotherapy, however, proved to be significantly superior in terms of biochemical recurrence-free survival (82 percent vs 61 percent; HR, 0.26, 0.14–0.48; p<0.001). Adjusting for preoperative prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score and pT stage weakened the magnitude of the interaction but did not attenuate significance (HR, 0.30, 0.16–0.54; p<0.001).

Adjuvant radiotherapy also had an acceptable toxicity profile. Erectile dysfunction was the most common grade 3 adverse event, occurring in 37 percent and 28 percent of the treatment and control groups, respectively. This was followed by urinary incontinence, which was reported in 12 percent and 5 percent, respectively. One grade 4 adverse event developed in the radiotherapy group.

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Most Read Articles
Jairia Dela Cruz, 01 Jan 2020
A novel low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) holds therapeutic potential in patients with mild-to-moderate erectile dysfunction (ED), restoring erectile function without deleterious consequences—a benefit attributed to the mechanical force of the device that can reverse the pathological changes in the corpus cavernosum, as shown in a recent study.