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Add-on oral corticosteroid of little benefit in persistent asthma

11 Sep 2020

A short-term course of oral corticosteroid medication does not appear to improve disease control in patients with moderate to severe persistent asthma initiating treatment with inhaled corticosteroid-and-long-acting beta agonist (ICS-LABA).

Twenty-four patients with moderate to severe persistent asthma who were naïve to maintenance treatment were randomized to receive 2 weeks of either corticosteroid (n=13; mean age, 45.0 years; nine males) or placebo (n=11; mean age, 35.7 years; four males) at the beginning of ICS-LABA as initial treatment.

Peak expiratory flow (PEF) was measured daily, and patients were required to complete an asthma diary for 12 weeks. They also underwent spirometry testing at 4 and 12 weeks.

After 2 weeks of add-on short-course treatment, ACT, ACQ, AQLQ, FEV1, FEV1 percent significantly improved in both groups as compared with baseline data (p<0.05). However, the changes observed in all parameters did not differ significantly between the two groups (p>0.05).

At 4 weeks, three patients (30.8 percent) in the corticosteroid group and two (18.2 percent) in the placebo group achieved total asthma control. Seven patients in each group achieved partial control (61.5 percent vs 63.6 percent). There was no significant difference in control rates between the two groups (p=0.632).

Findings at 12 weeks followed a similar pattern.

The present data indicate that ICS-LABA as an initial therapy was adequate for achieving asthma control in majority of the patients, researchers said. Therefore, routine use of short course of oral corticosteroid is not necessary.

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Most Read Articles
Audrey Abella, 03 Aug 2020
Adding the anti-GM-CSF* receptor-α monoclonal antibody mavrilimumab to standard care (SC) improved clinical outcomes in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia and systemic hyperinflammation who were not under mechanical ventilation (MV), an Italian study has shown.
Pearl Toh, 08 Dec 2020
Intravenous (IV) antibiotics are no better than oral antibiotics when it comes to eradicating Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa in children and adults with cystic fibrosis, yet are more costly than the latter, reveals the TORPEDO-CF study.
Rachel Soon, 05 Dec 2020

The Malaysian National Immunisation Programme (NIP) will now include a hexavalent combination DTaP-IPV-HiB-HepB vaccine and a pneumococcal vaccine.

Elvira Manzano, 12 Dec 2020
Having asthma or allergy does not make COVID-19 severe, a new study presented at ACAAI 2020 has shown.