Most Read Articles
Natalia Reoutova, 20 May 2020

Cancer patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appear to be at higher risk of severe outcomes, including death, but cancer type and treatment serve as better predictors, according to recent research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting I.

At the time of writing, COVID-19 has spread to more than 200 countries and territories, affecting an estimated 4.5 million people and killing over 300,000. Cancer, on the other hand, is newly diagnosed in 18 million people and takes the lives of 10 million every year.

“We have invited physician scientists who are at the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic, taking care of patients with cancer. They gathered prospective information to understand the effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer, are testing new treatments, and are making this knowledge available to the global research community, so we can all benefit from their experience,” said Professor Antoni Ribas from UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, US, chairperson of the COVID-19 and cancer plenary session of the meeting.

Activity restriction contributes to worse mental health in cancer survivors

07 Mar 2020
Emotional distress, anxiety, financial burden are among the things that are affecting cancer survivors.

Activity restriction (AR) appears to mediate the relationship between perceived pain and depression in cancer survivors, a new study has found.

Researchers administered a batter of questionnaires to 61 cancer survivors (mean age, 56.39±11.91 years; 62.3 percent male), including the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, the Cancer Fatigue Scale, the Activity Restriction Scale for Cancer patients, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Prostate cancer was the most prevalent diagnosis in the study sample (60.7 percent).

AR was significantly different across various types of cancer treatments. Those who received surgery, for instance, were more restricted than those who had not (p<0.05). These patients also tended to have greater depression scores (p<0.001).

Pearson’s correlation analysis found that perceived pain and fatigue were both significantly associated with depression, with r values ranging from 0.36–0.74. AR was likewise correlated with depression (r, 0.55; p<0.001).

Mediation analysis, with depression as the dependent variable, showed that AR was a significant mediator between perceived pain and depression (p<0.005), notwithstanding the significant and direct link between perceived pain and depression (p<0.001).

On the other hand, while fatigue was directly associated with depression (p<0.005), AR played no such significant mediating role.

“While in depressive symptomatology of cancer survivors, physical symptoms tend to be treated as predictors of depressive symptoms, our study suggests that the psychological restriction of daily life activities may have a greater effect on depressive symptoms in cancer survivors,” said researchers.

“Furthermore, because AR was experienced in the context of a survivorship period, it may need to be treated as a long long-term effect of the cancer diagnosis,” they added.

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Most Read Articles
Natalia Reoutova, 20 May 2020

Cancer patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appear to be at higher risk of severe outcomes, including death, but cancer type and treatment serve as better predictors, according to recent research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting I.

At the time of writing, COVID-19 has spread to more than 200 countries and territories, affecting an estimated 4.5 million people and killing over 300,000. Cancer, on the other hand, is newly diagnosed in 18 million people and takes the lives of 10 million every year.

“We have invited physician scientists who are at the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic, taking care of patients with cancer. They gathered prospective information to understand the effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer, are testing new treatments, and are making this knowledge available to the global research community, so we can all benefit from their experience,” said Professor Antoni Ribas from UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, US, chairperson of the COVID-19 and cancer plenary session of the meeting.