tinea%20capitis
TINEA CAPITIS
Tinea capitis  is a contagious dermatophytosis affecting the hair shaft and follicles of the scalp, eyebrows and eyelashes.
It is most common in the crowded areas as infection originates from contact with a pet or an infected person and asymptomatic carriage persists indefinitely.
It primarily affects children 3-7 years of age.
The causative agents are the genus Trichophyton and Microsporum.
Cardinal clinical feature is the combination of inflammation with hair breakage and loss.

Tinea%20capitis Patient Education

Patient Education

  • Educate patient regarding contagiousness of the disease
    • Identify & treat asymptomatic carriers in household members to avoid disease transmission
    • Avoid sharing hats, combs, towels, toys w/ an affected individual
    • Treat or remove an animal or pet infected w/ M canis
    • Disinfect belongings of infected patients such as hairbrushes, combs, beddings, etc
  • Children may attend school while being treated
  • Follow-up visits are needed for assessment of treatment response
    • Treatment course may be extended if patient is still symptomatic after completion of therapy
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