tinea%20capitis%20(pediatric)
TINEA CAPITIS (PEDIATRIC)
Tinea capitis lesions are a type of contagious dermatophytosis that are found on the scalp, hair follicles and/or surrounding skin.
It is most common in the crowded areas as infection originates from contact with a pet or an infected person and asymptomatic carriage persists indefinitely.
It primarily affects children 3-7 year of age.
The causative agents are the genus Trichophyton and Microsporum.
Cardinal clinical feature is the combination of inflammation with hair breakage and loss.

Tinea%20capitis%20(pediatric) Signs and Symptoms

Introduction

  • Most common in crowded areas as infection originates from contact w/ a pet or an infected person, & asymptomatic carriage persists indefinitely
  • Primarily affects children 3-7 years of age

Definition

  • Tinea capitis lesions are a type of contagious dermatophytosis that are found on the scalp, hair follicles &/or surrounding skin

Etiology

  • Causative agents are the two genera: Trichophyton & Microsporum
    • T tonsurans is the most common; M canis is the second most common
Causative Agents
  • Large-spored endothrix pattern chains of large spores w/in hair (Trichophyton tonsurans, T violaceum)
  • Large-spored ectothrix (T verrucosum, T mentagrophytes)
  • Small-spored ectothrix randomly arranged in masses inside & on the surface of the hair shaft (Microsporum canis, M audouinii)

Signs and Symptoms

  • Cardinal clinical feature is the combination of inflammation w/ hair breakage & loss
  • Patients present w/ any of several different clinical patterns of Tinea capitis infection
  • Cervical or occipital lymphadenopathy & some alopecia are typically present
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